2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/83571
Title:
The use of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer.
Authors:
Davidson, Emma J; Kitchener, Henry C; Stern, Peter L
Abstract:
The close association between high risk HPV infection and cervical carcinoma has provided the impetus for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination schedules. An effective prophylactic vaccine would obviate the need for population-based cervical screening programmes, while therapeutic vaccination might provide an effective adjunct to or replacement for conventional treatment for benign and malignant cervical disease. While the challenges associated with the design and implemention of immunotherapies are numerous, optimism remains high and it is expected that the next few decades will witness a revolutionary change in the way we treat cervical cancer and its premalignant lesions. A papillomavirus vaccine that prevented HPV infection on the one hand and acted against established disease on the other, would have a profound impact on one of the major cancers affecting women globally.
Affiliation:
Immunology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. edavidson@picr.man.ac.uk
Citation:
The use of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. 2002, 14 (3):193-200 Clin Oncol
Journal:
Clinical Oncology
Issue Date:
Jun-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/83571
DOI:
10.1053/clon.2002.0056
PubMed ID:
12109821
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0936-6555
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Emma J-
dc.contributor.authorKitchener, Henry C-
dc.contributor.authorStern, Peter L-
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-05T15:14:30Z-
dc.date.available2009-10-05T15:14:30Z-
dc.date.issued2002-06-
dc.identifier.citationThe use of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer. 2002, 14 (3):193-200 Clin Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn0936-6555-
dc.identifier.pmid12109821-
dc.identifier.doi10.1053/clon.2002.0056-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/83571-
dc.description.abstractThe close association between high risk HPV infection and cervical carcinoma has provided the impetus for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination schedules. An effective prophylactic vaccine would obviate the need for population-based cervical screening programmes, while therapeutic vaccination might provide an effective adjunct to or replacement for conventional treatment for benign and malignant cervical disease. While the challenges associated with the design and implemention of immunotherapies are numerous, optimism remains high and it is expected that the next few decades will witness a revolutionary change in the way we treat cervical cancer and its premalignant lesions. A papillomavirus vaccine that prevented HPV infection on the one hand and acted against established disease on the other, would have a profound impact on one of the major cancers affecting women globally.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectTumour Virus Infectionsen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshCancer Vaccines-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshPapillomaviridae-
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infections-
dc.subject.meshTumor Virus Infections-
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshViral Vaccines-
dc.titleThe use of vaccines in the prevention and treatment of cervical cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentImmunology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. edavidson@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalClinical Oncologyen

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