Endocrine complications of neoplastic diseases in children and adolescents.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/82513
Title:
Endocrine complications of neoplastic diseases in children and adolescents.
Authors:
Gleeson, Helena K; Shalet, Stephen M
Abstract:
Because of the increasing population of childhood cancer survivors, there is a need to focus on the late effects of cancer therapy. After discharge by their pediatric oncologists, it is essential that patients are not lost to the health system but rather are under continued surveillance with access to the appropriate physicians. Endocrine and metabolic consequences may impact the life of the patient both soon after cancer treatment and for many years in the future. The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature in the following areas: growth hormone (GH) deficiency, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues with GH therapy in childhood, safety of GH replacement, cardiovascular risk factors, osteopenia, thyroid problems, and gonadal damage resulting in infertility.
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK.
Citation:
Endocrine complications of neoplastic diseases in children and adolescents. 2001, 13 (4):346-51 Curr. Opin. Pediatr.
Journal:
Current Opinion in Pediatrics
Issue Date:
Aug-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/82513
PubMed ID:
11717561
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1040-8703
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGleeson, Helena K-
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-24T11:58:58Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-24T11:58:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001-08-
dc.identifier.citationEndocrine complications of neoplastic diseases in children and adolescents. 2001, 13 (4):346-51 Curr. Opin. Pediatr.en
dc.identifier.issn1040-8703-
dc.identifier.pmid11717561-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/82513-
dc.description.abstractBecause of the increasing population of childhood cancer survivors, there is a need to focus on the late effects of cancer therapy. After discharge by their pediatric oncologists, it is essential that patients are not lost to the health system but rather are under continued surveillance with access to the appropriate physicians. Endocrine and metabolic consequences may impact the life of the patient both soon after cancer treatment and for many years in the future. The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature in the following areas: growth hormone (GH) deficiency, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues with GH therapy in childhood, safety of GH replacement, cardiovascular risk factors, osteopenia, thyroid problems, and gonadal damage resulting in infertility.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshDwarfism, Pituitary-
dc.subject.meshEndocrine System Diseases-
dc.subject.meshGenitalia-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshObesity-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries-
dc.subject.meshSurvivors-
dc.subject.meshThyroid Diseases-
dc.titleEndocrine complications of neoplastic diseases in children and adolescents.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Pediatricsen

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