2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/82434
Title:
Cellular vaccine therapy for cancer.
Authors:
Armstrong, Anne C; Eaton, David; Ewing, Joanne
Abstract:
Observations that cells of the immune system are able to kill tumor cells both in vitro and in animal models have provided a compelling rationale for pursuit of a strategy whereby immune cells are administered as a therapeutic vaccine to patients with cancer. The successful outcome of this approach depends upon the ability to deliver this therapy in a manner in which a potent immune response is elicited. By harnessing the capacity of dendritic cells that are pivotal in priming the immune response and using gene therapy approaches to optimise the immune response, this may ultimately prove efficacious in the management of human cancer. Promising reports from recent clinical trials suggest that this may well be a realistic goal.
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Oncology, Paterson Institute of Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. Aarmstrong@picr.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Cellular vaccine therapy for cancer. 2002, 1 (3):303-16 Expert Rev Vaccines
Journal:
Expert Review of Vaccines
Issue Date:
Oct-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/82434
DOI:
10.1586/14760584.1.3.303
PubMed ID:
12901571
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-0584
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Anne C-
dc.contributor.authorEaton, David-
dc.contributor.authorEwing, Joanne-
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-24T08:20:31Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-24T08:20:31Z-
dc.date.issued2002-10-
dc.identifier.citationCellular vaccine therapy for cancer. 2002, 1 (3):303-16 Expert Rev Vaccinesen
dc.identifier.issn1476-0584-
dc.identifier.pmid12901571-
dc.identifier.doi10.1586/14760584.1.3.303-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/82434-
dc.description.abstractObservations that cells of the immune system are able to kill tumor cells both in vitro and in animal models have provided a compelling rationale for pursuit of a strategy whereby immune cells are administered as a therapeutic vaccine to patients with cancer. The successful outcome of this approach depends upon the ability to deliver this therapy in a manner in which a potent immune response is elicited. By harnessing the capacity of dendritic cells that are pivotal in priming the immune response and using gene therapy approaches to optimise the immune response, this may ultimately prove efficacious in the management of human cancer. Promising reports from recent clinical trials suggest that this may well be a realistic goal.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Antigensen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Neoplasm-
dc.subject.meshAutoimmunity-
dc.subject.meshCancer Vaccines-
dc.subject.meshDendritic Cells-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunity, Cellular-
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy, Adoptive-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes-
dc.titleCellular vaccine therapy for cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Oncology, Paterson Institute of Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. Aarmstrong@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalExpert Review of Vaccinesen
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