Stimulated production of vowel-like LX-waveforms and spectral damping in the absence of phonation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/80119
Title:
Stimulated production of vowel-like LX-waveforms and spectral damping in the absence of phonation.
Authors:
Moore, Christopher J; Jones, Susan
Abstract:
Electrical impedance 'LX' waveforms measured across the neck at the thyroid level during phonation are known to be correlated with vocal fold movement. Changes in vocal fold contact are thought to be the cause of this phenomenon though emerging applications in radiotherapy indicate that changes in the configuration of both fold and neck tissues are correlated with LX waveform shape. In this paper it is shown that a two-stage tissue damping model with controlled bandpass and passive low pass components is consistent with evidence from gradually degraded, controlled phonation. In particular it is shown that an externally applied stimulus to the vertebral processes of the neck can produce similar impedance waveforms in the absence of phonation and hence no controlled fold contact. It is postulated that this is initial evidence suggesting that both pressure waves and vocal fold contact components contribute to the production of the classical 'LX' waveform.
Affiliation:
North Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. infcjm@dalpha2.cr.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Stimulated production of vowel-like LX-waveforms and spectral damping in the absence of phonation., 24 (7-8):461-5 Med Eng Phys
Journal:
Medical Engineering & Physics
Issue Date:
2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/80119
DOI:
10.1016/S1350-4533(02)00065-6
PubMed ID:
12237040
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1350-4533
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Christopher J-
dc.contributor.authorJones, Susan-
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-07T14:32:32Z-
dc.date.available2009-09-07T14:32:32Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.citationStimulated production of vowel-like LX-waveforms and spectral damping in the absence of phonation., 24 (7-8):461-5 Med Eng Physen
dc.identifier.issn1350-4533-
dc.identifier.pmid12237040-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1350-4533(02)00065-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/80119-
dc.description.abstractElectrical impedance 'LX' waveforms measured across the neck at the thyroid level during phonation are known to be correlated with vocal fold movement. Changes in vocal fold contact are thought to be the cause of this phenomenon though emerging applications in radiotherapy indicate that changes in the configuration of both fold and neck tissues are correlated with LX waveform shape. In this paper it is shown that a two-stage tissue damping model with controlled bandpass and passive low pass components is consistent with evidence from gradually degraded, controlled phonation. In particular it is shown that an externally applied stimulus to the vertebral processes of the neck can produce similar impedance waveforms in the absence of phonation and hence no controlled fold contact. It is postulated that this is initial evidence suggesting that both pressure waves and vocal fold contact components contribute to the production of the classical 'LX' waveform.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshElectric Impedance-
dc.subject.meshElectrophysiology-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFourier Analysis-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLarynx-
dc.subject.meshLarynx, Artificial-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.subject.meshNeck-
dc.subject.meshPhonation-
dc.subject.meshPhysical Stimulation-
dc.subject.meshRespiration-
dc.subject.meshSpeech-
dc.subject.meshSpeech Acoustics-
dc.subject.meshSpeech Production Measurement-
dc.subject.meshVibration-
dc.subject.meshViscosity-
dc.subject.meshVocal Cords-
dc.titleStimulated production of vowel-like LX-waveforms and spectral damping in the absence of phonation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorth Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. infcjm@dalpha2.cr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalMedical Engineering & Physicsen
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