Quality of life measurement in the head and neck cancer radiotherapy clinic: is it feasible and worthwhile?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/79050
Title:
Quality of life measurement in the head and neck cancer radiotherapy clinic: is it feasible and worthwhile?
Authors:
Rampling, T; King, H; Mais, Kathleen L; Humphris, G M; Swindell, Ric; Sykes, Andrew J; Slevin, Nicholas J ( 0000-0002-3367-7013 )
Abstract:
Quality of Life (QOL) is now a standard end-point in clinical trials. The aim of this non-cohort study was to assess the practical issues surrounding the collection of QOL data in a non-trial setting, and to determine whether it is feasible and worthwhile. Ninety-two patients attending clinics before, or at least 3 months after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer were asked to complete the University of Washington QOL questionnaire (Version 4) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The three most important QOL domains cited by patients after radiotherapy related to saliva production, swallowing and taste. Most patients were able to complete both questionnaires in less than 10 min and reported little difficulty in understanding and completing them. The questionnaires indicated possible clinically significant levels of anxiety and depression in 31% and 16%, respectively. We perceived several benefits of routine QOL data collection in the clinic and this has now been adopted in our own practice.
Affiliation:
Medical School School of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Quality of life measurement in the head and neck cancer radiotherapy clinic: is it feasible and worthwhile? 2003, 15 (4):205-10 Clin Oncol
Journal:
Clinical Oncology
Issue Date:
Jun-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/79050
DOI:
10.1016/S0936-6555(02)00418-1
PubMed ID:
12846500
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0936-6555
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRampling, T-
dc.contributor.authorKing, H-
dc.contributor.authorMais, Kathleen L-
dc.contributor.authorHumphris, G M-
dc.contributor.authorSwindell, Ric-
dc.contributor.authorSykes, Andrew J-
dc.contributor.authorSlevin, Nicholas J-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-28T10:46:24Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-28T10:46:24Z-
dc.date.issued2003-06-
dc.identifier.citationQuality of life measurement in the head and neck cancer radiotherapy clinic: is it feasible and worthwhile? 2003, 15 (4):205-10 Clin Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn0936-6555-
dc.identifier.pmid12846500-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0936-6555(02)00418-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/79050-
dc.description.abstractQuality of Life (QOL) is now a standard end-point in clinical trials. The aim of this non-cohort study was to assess the practical issues surrounding the collection of QOL data in a non-trial setting, and to determine whether it is feasible and worthwhile. Ninety-two patients attending clinics before, or at least 3 months after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer were asked to complete the University of Washington QOL questionnaire (Version 4) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The three most important QOL domains cited by patients after radiotherapy related to saliva production, swallowing and taste. Most patients were able to complete both questionnaires in less than 10 min and reported little difficulty in understanding and completing them. The questionnaires indicated possible clinically significant levels of anxiety and depression in 31% and 16%, respectively. We perceived several benefits of routine QOL data collection in the clinic and this has now been adopted in our own practice.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHead and Neck Canceren
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHead and Neck Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.titleQuality of life measurement in the head and neck cancer radiotherapy clinic: is it feasible and worthwhile?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMedical School School of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical Oncologyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.