The psychological impact of cancer on patients' partners and other key relatives: a review.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/78983
Title:
The psychological impact of cancer on patients' partners and other key relatives: a review.
Authors:
Pitceathly, Carolyn; Maguire, Peter
Abstract:
Partners and other family members are key supports for cancer patients. Most cope well with the caregiving role, but an important minority become highly distressed or develop an affective disorder. Female carers and those with a history of psychiatric morbidity are more vulnerable, as are those who take a more negative view of the patient's illness and its impact on their lives. Carers are likely to become more distressed and develop psychiatric morbidity as the illness advances and treatment is palliative. Carers are also more at risk when they lack a support network of their own and when there are relationship difficulties with the patient. The review discusses why, given this evidence, carers fail to take advantage of interventions designed to help them and those who participate derive only limited psychological benefits.
Affiliation:
CRUK Psychological Medicine Group, Stanley House, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. carolyn.pitceathly@man.ac.uk
Citation:
The psychological impact of cancer on patients' partners and other key relatives: a review. 2003, 39 (11):1517-24 Eur. J. Cancer
Journal:
European Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
Jul-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/78983
DOI:
10.1016/S0959-8049(03)00309-5
PubMed ID:
12855257
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0959-8049
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPitceathly, Carolyn-
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Peter-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-27T16:10:56Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-27T16:10:56Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-
dc.identifier.citationThe psychological impact of cancer on patients' partners and other key relatives: a review. 2003, 39 (11):1517-24 Eur. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0959-8049-
dc.identifier.pmid12855257-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0959-8049(03)00309-5-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78983-
dc.description.abstractPartners and other family members are key supports for cancer patients. Most cope well with the caregiving role, but an important minority become highly distressed or develop an affective disorder. Female carers and those with a history of psychiatric morbidity are more vulnerable, as are those who take a more negative view of the patient's illness and its impact on their lives. Carers are likely to become more distressed and develop psychiatric morbidity as the illness advances and treatment is palliative. Carers are also more at risk when they lack a support network of their own and when there are relationship difficulties with the patient. The review discusses why, given this evidence, carers fail to take advantage of interventions designed to help them and those who participate derive only limited psychological benefits.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychological-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshAnxiety-
dc.subject.meshCaregivers-
dc.subject.meshCommunication-
dc.subject.meshCost of Illness-
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder-
dc.subject.meshFamily Health-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInterpersonal Relations-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction-
dc.subject.meshRespite Care-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.subject.meshSocial Class-
dc.subject.meshSocial Support-
dc.subject.meshSpouses-
dc.titleThe psychological impact of cancer on patients' partners and other key relatives: a review.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRUK Psychological Medicine Group, Stanley House, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. carolyn.pitceathly@man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Canceren

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