Skeletal requirements for optimal growth hormone replacement in the transitional years.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/78977
Title:
Skeletal requirements for optimal growth hormone replacement in the transitional years.
Authors:
Mukherjee, Annice; Attanasio, Andrea F; Shalet, Stephen M
Abstract:
In addition to its well-established effects on linear growth in childhood and adolescence, growth hormone (GH) has both direct and indirect actions on bone remodelling and homeostasis. In this review, the discussion begins with the influence of childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency (CO-GHD) on bone mineral accretion. The limitations of methods of assessing bone mineral density (BMD) are highlighted and specific influential factors, which affect peak bone mass achievement and therefore skeletal health in later life, are evaluated.
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester, UK. stephen.m.shalet@man.ac.uk
Citation:
Skeletal requirements for optimal growth hormone replacement in the transitional years. 2003, 13 Suppl A:S130-5 Growth Horm. IGF Res.
Journal:
Growth Hormone & IGF Research
Issue Date:
Aug-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/78977
DOI:
10.1016/S1096-6374(03)00069-8
PubMed ID:
12914741
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1096-6374
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMukherjee, Annice-
dc.contributor.authorAttanasio, Andrea F-
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-27T15:37:04Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-27T15:37:04Z-
dc.date.issued2003-08-
dc.identifier.citationSkeletal requirements for optimal growth hormone replacement in the transitional years. 2003, 13 Suppl A:S130-5 Growth Horm. IGF Res.en
dc.identifier.issn1096-6374-
dc.identifier.pmid12914741-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1096-6374(03)00069-8-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78977-
dc.description.abstractIn addition to its well-established effects on linear growth in childhood and adolescence, growth hormone (GH) has both direct and indirect actions on bone remodelling and homeostasis. In this review, the discussion begins with the influence of childhood-onset growth hormone deficiency (CO-GHD) on bone mineral accretion. The limitations of methods of assessing bone mineral density (BMD) are highlighted and specific influential factors, which affect peak bone mass achievement and therefore skeletal health in later life, are evaluated.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAging-
dc.subject.meshBone Density-
dc.subject.meshBone Development-
dc.subject.meshBone Remodeling-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshHormone Replacement Therapy-
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypopituitarism-
dc.titleSkeletal requirements for optimal growth hormone replacement in the transitional years.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester, UK. stephen.m.shalet@man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalGrowth Hormone & IGF Researchen
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