2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/78909
Title:
Radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency.
Authors:
Darzy, Ken H; Shalet, Stephen M
Abstract:
Deficiency of one or more anterior pituitary hormones may follow treatment with external irradiation when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis falls within the fields of irradiation. Hypopituitarism occurs in patients who receive radiation therapy for pituitary tumours, nasopharyngeal cancer and primary brain tumours, as well as in children who undergo prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, or total body irradiation for a variety of tumours and other diseases. The degree of pituitary hormonal deficit is related to the radiation dose received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Thus, after lower radiation doses isolated growth hormone deficiency ensues, whilst higher doses may produce hypopituitarism. The timing of onset of the radiation-induced pituitary hormone deficit is also dose-dependent. The main site of radiation damage is the hypothalamus rather than the pituitary, although the latter may be affected directly.
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency. 2003, 59 Suppl 1:1-11 Horm. Res.
Journal:
Hormone Research
Issue Date:
2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/78909
DOI:
10.1159/000067834
PubMed ID:
12566714
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0301-0163
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDarzy, Ken H-
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-27T14:33:15Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-27T14:33:15Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationRadiation-induced growth hormone deficiency. 2003, 59 Suppl 1:1-11 Horm. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn0301-0163-
dc.identifier.pmid12566714-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000067834-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78909-
dc.description.abstractDeficiency of one or more anterior pituitary hormones may follow treatment with external irradiation when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis falls within the fields of irradiation. Hypopituitarism occurs in patients who receive radiation therapy for pituitary tumours, nasopharyngeal cancer and primary brain tumours, as well as in children who undergo prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, or total body irradiation for a variety of tumours and other diseases. The degree of pituitary hormonal deficit is related to the radiation dose received by the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Thus, after lower radiation doses isolated growth hormone deficiency ensues, whilst higher doses may produce hypopituitarism. The timing of onset of the radiation-induced pituitary hormone deficit is also dose-dependent. The main site of radiation damage is the hypothalamus rather than the pituitary, although the latter may be affected directly.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshBody Height-
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow Transplantation-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation-
dc.subject.meshGonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-
dc.subject.meshGrowth Disorders-
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHypopituitarism-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPuberty-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries-
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy-
dc.titleRadiation-induced growth hormone deficiency.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalHormone Researchen

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