Total deletion of in vivo telomere elongation capacity: an ambitious but possibly ultimate cure for all age-related human cancers.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/78131
Title:
Total deletion of in vivo telomere elongation capacity: an ambitious but possibly ultimate cure for all age-related human cancers.
Authors:
De Grey, Aubrey D N J; Campbell, F Charles; Dokal, Inderjeet; Fairbairn, Leslie J; Graham, Gerry J; Jahoda, Colin A B; Porterg, Andrew C G
Abstract:
Despite enormous effort, progress in reducing mortality from cancer remains modest. Can a true cancer "cure" ever be developed, given the vast versatility that tumors derive from their genomic instability? Here we consider the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a therapy that, unlike any available or in development, could never be escaped by spontaneous changes of gene expression: the total elimination from the body of all genetic potential for telomere elongation, combined with stem cell therapies administered about once a decade to maintain proliferative tissues despite this handicap. We term this therapy WILT, for whole-body interdiction of lengthening of telomeres. We first argue that a whole-body gene-deletion approach, however bizarre it initially seems, is truly the only way to overcome the hypermutation that makes tumors so insidious. We then identify the key obstacles to developing such a therapy and conclude that, while some will probably be insurmountable for at least a decade, none is a clear-cut showstopper. Hence, given the absence of alternatives with comparable anticancer promise, we advocate working toward such a therapy.
Affiliation:
Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK. ag24@gen.cam.ac.uk
Citation:
Total deletion of in vivo telomere elongation capacity: an ambitious but possibly ultimate cure for all age-related human cancers. 2004, 1019:147-70 Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.
Journal:
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Issue Date:
Jun-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/78131
DOI:
10.1196/annals.1297.026
PubMed ID:
15247008
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0077-8923
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDe Grey, Aubrey D N J-
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, F Charles-
dc.contributor.authorDokal, Inderjeet-
dc.contributor.authorFairbairn, Leslie J-
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Gerry J-
dc.contributor.authorJahoda, Colin A B-
dc.contributor.authorPorterg, Andrew C G-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-21T10:21:20Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-21T10:21:20Z-
dc.date.issued2004-06-
dc.identifier.citationTotal deletion of in vivo telomere elongation capacity: an ambitious but possibly ultimate cure for all age-related human cancers. 2004, 1019:147-70 Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci.en
dc.identifier.issn0077-8923-
dc.identifier.pmid15247008-
dc.identifier.doi10.1196/annals.1297.026-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78131-
dc.description.abstractDespite enormous effort, progress in reducing mortality from cancer remains modest. Can a true cancer "cure" ever be developed, given the vast versatility that tumors derive from their genomic instability? Here we consider the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a therapy that, unlike any available or in development, could never be escaped by spontaneous changes of gene expression: the total elimination from the body of all genetic potential for telomere elongation, combined with stem cell therapies administered about once a decade to maintain proliferative tissues despite this handicap. We term this therapy WILT, for whole-body interdiction of lengthening of telomeres. We first argue that a whole-body gene-deletion approach, however bizarre it initially seems, is truly the only way to overcome the hypermutation that makes tumors so insidious. We then identify the key obstacles to developing such a therapy and conclude that, while some will probably be insurmountable for at least a decade, none is a clear-cut showstopper. Hence, given the absence of alternatives with comparable anticancer promise, we advocate working toward such a therapy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectCancer Metastasisen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow Cells-
dc.subject.meshCell Aging-
dc.subject.meshDNA-
dc.subject.meshDisease Progression-
dc.subject.meshGene Deletion-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmune System-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshMice, Knockout-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.subject.meshMutation-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Metastasis-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshStem Cells-
dc.subject.meshTelomerase-
dc.subject.meshTelomere-
dc.titleTotal deletion of in vivo telomere elongation capacity: an ambitious but possibly ultimate cure for all age-related human cancers.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK. ag24@gen.cam.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciencesen

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