Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a perspective on the recent advances and the experience with gefitinib.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/77864
Title:
Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a perspective on the recent advances and the experience with gefitinib.
Authors:
Onn, A; Tsuboi, M; Thatcher, Nick
Abstract:
Worldwide, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality and, until screening detects early disease, treatment for the majority of patients will consist of radiation therapy, chemotherapy or combinations thereof. Modern mono and doublet chemotherapy regimens have translated into modest increases in life expectancy and improved quality of life, but at the expense of systemic and pulmonary adverse events (AEs). There is a great unmet need to provide effective therapy for advanced NSCLC that does not have the toxicity burden of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Novel drugs that inhibit a range of growth factor receptors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib ('Iressa') and erlotinib ('Tarceva') or the monoclonal antibody cetuximab ('Erbitux'), have recently been evaluated. Having demonstrated antitumour activity and rapid symptom improvement in pretreated patients with advanced NSCLC, gefitinib was approved in the USA, Japan and other countries. Gefitinib is well tolerated with a low incidence of grade 3/4 AEs. Interstitial lung disease has been reported in a small number of patients receiving gefitinib, although this may be attributed to other treatments and conditions. Nevertheless, although the use of novel treatments requires vigilance for unexpected AEs such as pulmonary toxicity, in this area of high unmet clinical need, the benefits outweigh the risks in patients for whom no other proven effective treatment exists.
Affiliation:
Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Box 403, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030-4009, USA. amironn@mdanderson.org
Citation:
Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a perspective on the recent advances and the experience with gefitinib. 2004, 91 Suppl 2:S11-7 Br. J. Cancer
Journal:
British Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
Aug-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/77864
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6602062
PubMed ID:
15340373
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-0920
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOnn, A-
dc.contributor.authorTsuboi, M-
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nick-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-19T14:03:01Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-19T14:03:01Z-
dc.date.issued2004-08-
dc.identifier.citationTreatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a perspective on the recent advances and the experience with gefitinib. 2004, 91 Suppl 2:S11-7 Br. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920-
dc.identifier.pmid15340373-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bjc.6602062-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/77864-
dc.description.abstractWorldwide, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality and, until screening detects early disease, treatment for the majority of patients will consist of radiation therapy, chemotherapy or combinations thereof. Modern mono and doublet chemotherapy regimens have translated into modest increases in life expectancy and improved quality of life, but at the expense of systemic and pulmonary adverse events (AEs). There is a great unmet need to provide effective therapy for advanced NSCLC that does not have the toxicity burden of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Novel drugs that inhibit a range of growth factor receptors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib ('Iressa') and erlotinib ('Tarceva') or the monoclonal antibody cetuximab ('Erbitux'), have recently been evaluated. Having demonstrated antitumour activity and rapid symptom improvement in pretreated patients with advanced NSCLC, gefitinib was approved in the USA, Japan and other countries. Gefitinib is well tolerated with a low incidence of grade 3/4 AEs. Interstitial lung disease has been reported in a small number of patients receiving gefitinib, although this may be attributed to other treatments and conditions. Nevertheless, although the use of novel treatments requires vigilance for unexpected AEs such as pulmonary toxicity, in this area of high unmet clinical need, the benefits outweigh the risks in patients for whom no other proven effective treatment exists.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAntimetabolites, Antineoplastic-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung-
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials as Topic-
dc.subject.meshDeoxycytidine-
dc.subject.meshHealth Status-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.titleTreatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a perspective on the recent advances and the experience with gefitinib.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Box 403, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030-4009, USA. amironn@mdanderson.orgen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren
All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.