Three distinct subgroups of hypodiploidy in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/77838
Title:
Three distinct subgroups of hypodiploidy in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
Authors:
Harrison, Christine J; Moorman, Anthony V; Broadfield, Zoë J; Cheung, Kan L; Harris, Rachel L; Reza Jalali, G; Robinson, Hazel M; Barber, Kerry E; Richards, Susan M; Mitchell, Christopher D; Eden, Tim O B; Hann, Ian M; Hill, Frank G H; Kinsey, Sally E; Gibson, Brenda E; Lilleyman, John S; Vora, Ajay J; Goldstone, Anthony H; Franklin, Ian M; Durrant, I Jill; Martineau, Mary
Abstract:
This study of children and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the largest series of patients with hypodiploidy (<46 chromosomes) yet reported. The incidence of 5% was independent of age. Patients were subdivided by the number of chromosomes; near-haploidy (23-29 chromosomes), low hypodiploidy (33-39 chromosomes) and high hypodiploidy (42-45 chromosomes). The near-haploid and low hypodiploid groups were characterized by their chromosomal gains and a doubled hyperdiploid population. Structural abnormalities were more frequent in the low hypodiploid group. Near-haploidy was restricted to children of median age 7 years (range 2-15) whereas low hypodiploidy occurred in an older group of median age 15 years (range 9-54). Patients with 42-45 chromosomes were characterized by complex karyotypes involving chromosomes 7, 9 and 12. The features shared by the few patients with 42-44 chromosomes and the large number with 45 justified their inclusion in the same group. Survival analysis showed a poor outcome for the near-haploid and low hypodiploid groups compared to those with 42-45 chromosomes. Thus cytogenetics, or at least a clear definition of the modal chromosome number, is essential at diagnosis in order to stratify patients with hypodiploidy into the appropriate risk group for treatment.
Affiliation:
Leukaemia Research Fund Cytogenetics Group, Cancer Sciences Division, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. harrison@soton.ac.uk
Citation:
Three distinct subgroups of hypodiploidy in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. 2004, 125 (5):552-9 Br. J. Haematol.
Journal:
British Journal of Haematology
Issue Date:
Jun-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/77838
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2141.2004.04948.x
PubMed ID:
15147369
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-1048
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Christine J-
dc.contributor.authorMoorman, Anthony V-
dc.contributor.authorBroadfield, Zoë J-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Kan L-
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Rachel L-
dc.contributor.authorReza Jalali, G-
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Hazel M-
dc.contributor.authorBarber, Kerry E-
dc.contributor.authorRichards, Susan M-
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Christopher D-
dc.contributor.authorEden, Tim O B-
dc.contributor.authorHann, Ian M-
dc.contributor.authorHill, Frank G H-
dc.contributor.authorKinsey, Sally E-
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Brenda E-
dc.contributor.authorLilleyman, John S-
dc.contributor.authorVora, Ajay J-
dc.contributor.authorGoldstone, Anthony H-
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Ian M-
dc.contributor.authorDurrant, I Jill-
dc.contributor.authorMartineau, Mary-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-19T11:27:09Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-19T11:27:09Z-
dc.date.issued2004-06-
dc.identifier.citationThree distinct subgroups of hypodiploidy in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. 2004, 125 (5):552-9 Br. J. Haematol.en
dc.identifier.issn0007-1048-
dc.identifier.pmid15147369-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2141.2004.04948.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/77838-
dc.description.abstractThis study of children and adults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the largest series of patients with hypodiploidy (<46 chromosomes) yet reported. The incidence of 5% was independent of age. Patients were subdivided by the number of chromosomes; near-haploidy (23-29 chromosomes), low hypodiploidy (33-39 chromosomes) and high hypodiploidy (42-45 chromosomes). The near-haploid and low hypodiploid groups were characterized by their chromosomal gains and a doubled hyperdiploid population. Structural abnormalities were more frequent in the low hypodiploid group. Near-haploidy was restricted to children of median age 7 years (range 2-15) whereas low hypodiploidy occurred in an older group of median age 15 years (range 9-54). Patients with 42-45 chromosomes were characterized by complex karyotypes involving chromosomes 7, 9 and 12. The features shared by the few patients with 42-44 chromosomes and the large number with 45 justified their inclusion in the same group. Survival analysis showed a poor outcome for the near-haploid and low hypodiploid groups compared to those with 42-45 chromosomes. Thus cytogenetics, or at least a clear definition of the modal chromosome number, is essential at diagnosis in order to stratify patients with hypodiploidy into the appropriate risk group for treatment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLeukaemia Lymphomaen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAneuploidy-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChromosomes, Human-
dc.subject.meshDisease-Free Survival-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshKaryotyping-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma-
dc.subject.meshPrognosis-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis-
dc.titleThree distinct subgroups of hypodiploidy in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLeukaemia Research Fund Cytogenetics Group, Cancer Sciences Division, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. harrison@soton.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Haematologyen

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