2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/77836
Title:
Stepping into adulthood: the transition period.
Authors:
Shalet, Stephen M
Abstract:
The period of growth from late puberty to full adult maturation, termed the transition period, is important for tissue maturation. Peak bone mass, muscle mass and strength are usually attained in this period. However, it is common clinical practice in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) to discontinue growth hormone (GH) treatment in adolescence after attainment of final height. Therefore, patients with childhood-onset GHD that continues into adulthood and who do not receive treatment as adults may experience more severe consequences than patients who acquire GHD as an adult. Recent studies indicate that bone and muscle maturation are attenuated if GH treatment is discontinued at final height. Furthermore, these patients will also develop cardiovascular risk factors that are normally associated with GHD in adults. Much debate surrounds when retesting for GHD should be carried out and when GH treatment should be restarted in adolescents; many of these patients will not have severe GHD according to the criteria set for adults. The transition period is an appropriate time to modify GH doses. Finally, registries exist that have recorded clinical treatment experiences for children and adults. Tools that collect and analyse data provide an important opportunity to investigate issues related to transition.
Affiliation:
Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. stephen.m.shalet@man.ac.uk
Citation:
Stepping into adulthood: the transition period. 2004, 62 Suppl 4:15-22 Horm. Res.
Journal:
Hormone Research
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/77836
DOI:
10.1159/000080904
PubMed ID:
15591762
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0301-0163
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-19T11:18:00Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-19T11:18:00Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationStepping into adulthood: the transition period. 2004, 62 Suppl 4:15-22 Horm. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn0301-0163-
dc.identifier.pmid15591762-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000080904-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/77836-
dc.description.abstractThe period of growth from late puberty to full adult maturation, termed the transition period, is important for tissue maturation. Peak bone mass, muscle mass and strength are usually attained in this period. However, it is common clinical practice in children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) to discontinue growth hormone (GH) treatment in adolescence after attainment of final height. Therefore, patients with childhood-onset GHD that continues into adulthood and who do not receive treatment as adults may experience more severe consequences than patients who acquire GHD as an adult. Recent studies indicate that bone and muscle maturation are attenuated if GH treatment is discontinued at final height. Furthermore, these patients will also develop cardiovascular risk factors that are normally associated with GHD in adults. Much debate surrounds when retesting for GHD should be carried out and when GH treatment should be restarted in adolescents; many of these patients will not have severe GHD according to the criteria set for adults. The transition period is an appropriate time to modify GH doses. Finally, registries exist that have recorded clinical treatment experiences for children and adults. Tools that collect and analyse data provide an important opportunity to investigate issues related to transition.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Development-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshDrug Administration Schedule-
dc.subject.meshGrowth Hormone-
dc.subject.meshHormone Replacement Therapy-
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshSteroid Metabolism, Inborn Errors-
dc.titleStepping into adulthood: the transition period.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. stephen.m.shalet@man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalHormone Researchen

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