Mapping metabolic brain activation during human volitional swallowing: a positron emission tomography study using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/76781
Title:
Mapping metabolic brain activation during human volitional swallowing: a positron emission tomography study using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose.
Authors:
Harris, Mary Louise; Julyan, Peter J; Kulkarni, Bhavna; Gow, David; Hobson, Anthony; Hastings, David L; Zweit, Jamal; Hamdy, Shaheen
Abstract:
We have previously shown that labelled water positron emission tomography (H2(15)O PET) can be used to identify regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes in the human brain during volitional swallowing. (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET), by comparison, uses a glucose analogue to quantitatively measure regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) rather than rCBF. The main advantage of FDG PET is improved spatial resolution, and because of its pharmacodynamic properties, activation can be performed external to the scanner, allowing subjects to assume more physiologic positions. We therefore conducted a study of the brain's metabolic response while swallowing in the erect seated position, using FDG PET. Eight healthy male volunteers were studied with a randomised 2 scan paradigm of rest or water swallowing at 20-second intervals for 30 minutes. Data were analysed with SPM99 using multisubject conditions and covariates design. During swallowing, analysis identified increased rCMRglc (P<0.01) in the following areas: left sensorimotor cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, precuneus, anterior insula, left and right lateral postcentral gyrus, and left and right occipital cortex. Decreased rCMRglc were also seen in the right premotor cortex, right and left sensory and motor association cortices, left posterior insula and left cerebellum. Thus, FDG PET can be applied to measure the brain metabolic activity associated with volitional swallowing and has the advantage of normal task engagement. This has implications for future activation studies in patients, especially those suffering swallowing problems after brain injury.
Affiliation:
Department of Gastrointestinal Science, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Manchester, UK. lou.harris@man.ac.uk
Citation:
Mapping metabolic brain activation during human volitional swallowing: a positron emission tomography study using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose. 2005, 25 (4):520-6 J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
Journal:
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Issue Date:
Apr-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/76781
DOI:
10.1038/sj.jcbfm.9600042
PubMed ID:
15689960
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0271-678X
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Mary Louise-
dc.contributor.authorJulyan, Peter J-
dc.contributor.authorKulkarni, Bhavna-
dc.contributor.authorGow, David-
dc.contributor.authorHobson, Anthony-
dc.contributor.authorHastings, David L-
dc.contributor.authorZweit, Jamal-
dc.contributor.authorHamdy, Shaheen-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-10T10:44:06Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-10T10:44:06Z-
dc.date.issued2005-04-
dc.identifier.citationMapping metabolic brain activation during human volitional swallowing: a positron emission tomography study using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose. 2005, 25 (4):520-6 J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.en
dc.identifier.issn0271-678X-
dc.identifier.pmid15689960-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.jcbfm.9600042-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/76781-
dc.description.abstractWe have previously shown that labelled water positron emission tomography (H2(15)O PET) can be used to identify regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes in the human brain during volitional swallowing. (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET), by comparison, uses a glucose analogue to quantitatively measure regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglc) rather than rCBF. The main advantage of FDG PET is improved spatial resolution, and because of its pharmacodynamic properties, activation can be performed external to the scanner, allowing subjects to assume more physiologic positions. We therefore conducted a study of the brain's metabolic response while swallowing in the erect seated position, using FDG PET. Eight healthy male volunteers were studied with a randomised 2 scan paradigm of rest or water swallowing at 20-second intervals for 30 minutes. Data were analysed with SPM99 using multisubject conditions and covariates design. During swallowing, analysis identified increased rCMRglc (P<0.01) in the following areas: left sensorimotor cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, precuneus, anterior insula, left and right lateral postcentral gyrus, and left and right occipital cortex. Decreased rCMRglc were also seen in the right premotor cortex, right and left sensory and motor association cortices, left posterior insula and left cerebellum. Thus, FDG PET can be applied to measure the brain metabolic activity associated with volitional swallowing and has the advantage of normal task engagement. This has implications for future activation studies in patients, especially those suffering swallowing problems after brain injury.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBrain-
dc.subject.meshBrain Chemistry-
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping-
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex-
dc.subject.meshData Interpretation, Statistical-
dc.subject.meshDeglutition-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFluorodeoxyglucose F18-
dc.subject.meshGlucose-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshRadiopharmaceuticals-
dc.titleMapping metabolic brain activation during human volitional swallowing: a positron emission tomography study using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Gastrointestinal Science, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Manchester, UK. lou.harris@man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolismen
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