Antibody phage display technologies with special reference to angiogenesis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/76476
Title:
Antibody phage display technologies with special reference to angiogenesis.
Authors:
Smith, Julia; Kontermann, Roland E; Embleton, Jim; Kumar, Shant
Abstract:
The presence of blood vessels is a prerequisite for normal development, tissue growth, and tissue repair. However, its abnormal occurrence or absence can also potentiate disease processes. Angiogenic therapies have been used to stimulate blood vessel growth in ischemic conditions such as severe end-stage peripheral vascular disease, ischemic heart disease and stroke and for inhibition of angiogenesis in tumors. The targeting and identification of novel endothelial cell (EC) markers that can ultimately be used in angiogenic strategies is an expanding field but is limited by the availability of reagents. For instance repeated injection of mouse monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against angiogenic EC, can result in the production of autoantibodies. Therefore, these mouse Mabs cannot be used for therapeutic purposes. Phage display technology was employed in this context to select antibodies, proteins, and peptides against known or novel EC antigens. Furthermore, technologies have been developed that enable the specific targeting of epitopes on cells including the endothelium with high-affinity/avidity antibodies. The focus for these antibody targeting strategies are markers that are unique or up-regulated on angiogenic EC including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) KDR, endoglin (CD105), and the extracellular domain B (ED-B) domain of fibronectin (FN). These markers are reviewed herein.
Affiliation:
University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK. Jusmith@fs1.scg.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Antibody phage display technologies with special reference to angiogenesis. 2005, 19 (3):331-41 FASEB J.
Journal:
The FASEB Journal
Issue Date:
Mar-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/76476
DOI:
10.1096/fj.04-2863rev
PubMed ID:
15746176
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1530-6860
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Julia-
dc.contributor.authorKontermann, Roland E-
dc.contributor.authorEmbleton, Jim-
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Shant-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-06T10:14:35Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-06T10:14:35Z-
dc.date.issued2005-03-
dc.identifier.citationAntibody phage display technologies with special reference to angiogenesis. 2005, 19 (3):331-41 FASEB J.en
dc.identifier.issn1530-6860-
dc.identifier.pmid15746176-
dc.identifier.doi10.1096/fj.04-2863rev-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/76476-
dc.description.abstractThe presence of blood vessels is a prerequisite for normal development, tissue growth, and tissue repair. However, its abnormal occurrence or absence can also potentiate disease processes. Angiogenic therapies have been used to stimulate blood vessel growth in ischemic conditions such as severe end-stage peripheral vascular disease, ischemic heart disease and stroke and for inhibition of angiogenesis in tumors. The targeting and identification of novel endothelial cell (EC) markers that can ultimately be used in angiogenic strategies is an expanding field but is limited by the availability of reagents. For instance repeated injection of mouse monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against angiogenic EC, can result in the production of autoantibodies. Therefore, these mouse Mabs cannot be used for therapeutic purposes. Phage display technology was employed in this context to select antibodies, proteins, and peptides against known or novel EC antigens. Furthermore, technologies have been developed that enable the specific targeting of epitopes on cells including the endothelium with high-affinity/avidity antibodies. The focus for these antibody targeting strategies are markers that are unique or up-regulated on angiogenic EC including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) KDR, endoglin (CD105), and the extracellular domain B (ED-B) domain of fibronectin (FN). These markers are reviewed herein.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAngiogenesis Inducing Agents-
dc.subject.meshAngiogenesis Inhibitors-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonal-
dc.subject.meshAntigens-
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD-
dc.subject.meshEndothelial Cells-
dc.subject.meshFibronectins-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Fab Fragments-
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Fragments-
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin G-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Physiologic-
dc.subject.meshPeptide Library-
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Cell Surface-
dc.subject.meshVascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1-
dc.subject.meshVascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2-
dc.titleAntibody phage display technologies with special reference to angiogenesis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK. Jusmith@fs1.scg.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalThe FASEB Journalen
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