Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR): a target for anticancer therapeutics.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/75839
Title:
Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR): a target for anticancer therapeutics.
Authors:
Board, Ruth E; Jayson, Gordon C ( 0000-0002-8515-8944 )
Abstract:
Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their tyrosine kinase receptors (PDGFRs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of tumor types and play an important role in angiogenesis. Tumor growth can be promoted by PDGF via autocrine stimulation of malignant cells, by overexpression or overactivation of PDGFRs, or by stimulation of angiogenesis within the tumor. These mechanisms could provide possible therapeutic targets. PDGFR blockade may also lower the interstitial fluid pressure within solid tumors and enhance drug delivery. Here we discuss the possible therapeutic roles of PDGFR antagonists in the treatment of cancer, alone and in combination with chemotherapy or other targeted agents. Extensive experimental data highlight the potential therapeutic advantage of targeting PDGFR. However, recent clinical data suggest that antagonism of this growth factor is associated with fluid accumulation that could obscure any clinical benefit. Further clinical research is required to optimise inhibition of this cytokine-receptor system.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK Department Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. Ruth.Board@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk
Citation:
Platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR): a target for anticancer therapeutics., 8 (1-2):75-83 Drug Resist. Updat.
Journal:
Drug Resistance Updates
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/75839
DOI:
10.1016/j.drup.2005.03.004
PubMed ID:
15939344
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1368-7646
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBoard, Ruth E-
dc.contributor.authorJayson, Gordon C-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-29T12:22:33Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-29T12:22:33Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationPlatelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR): a target for anticancer therapeutics., 8 (1-2):75-83 Drug Resist. Updat.en
dc.identifier.issn1368-7646-
dc.identifier.pmid15939344-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.drup.2005.03.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/75839-
dc.description.abstractPlatelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their tyrosine kinase receptors (PDGFRs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of tumor types and play an important role in angiogenesis. Tumor growth can be promoted by PDGF via autocrine stimulation of malignant cells, by overexpression or overactivation of PDGFRs, or by stimulation of angiogenesis within the tumor. These mechanisms could provide possible therapeutic targets. PDGFR blockade may also lower the interstitial fluid pressure within solid tumors and enhance drug delivery. Here we discuss the possible therapeutic roles of PDGFR antagonists in the treatment of cancer, alone and in combination with chemotherapy or other targeted agents. Extensive experimental data highlight the potential therapeutic advantage of targeting PDGFR. However, recent clinical data suggest that antagonism of this growth factor is associated with fluid accumulation that could obscure any clinical benefit. Further clinical research is required to optimise inhibition of this cytokine-receptor system.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectOvarian Canceren
dc.subjectProstatic Canceren
dc.subject.meshAngiogenesis Inhibitors-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshDermatofibrosarcoma-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGlioma-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Pathologic-
dc.subject.meshOvarian Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-
dc.titlePlatelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR): a target for anticancer therapeutics.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK Department Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. Ruth.Board@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalDrug Resistance Updatesen

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