Day care in infancy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: findings from UK case-control study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/75817
Title:
Day care in infancy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: findings from UK case-control study.
Authors:
Gilham, C; Peto, J; Simpson, J; Roman, E; Eden, Tim O B; Greaves, M; Alexander, F E
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that reduced exposure to common infections in the first year of life increases the risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Design and setting The United Kingdom childhood cancer study (UKCCS) is a large population based case-control study of childhood cancer across 10 regions of the UK. PARTICIPANTS: 6305 children (aged 2-14 years) without cancer; 3140 children with cancer (diagnosed 1991-6), of whom 1286 had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Day care and social activity during the first year of life were used as proxies for potential exposure to infection in infancy. RESULTS: Increasing levels of social activity were associated with consistent reductions in risk of ALL; a dose-response trend was seen. When children whose mothers reported no regular activity outside the family were used as the reference group, odds ratios for increasing levels of activity were 0.73 (95% confidence interval 0.62 to 0.87) for any social activity, 0.62 (0.51 to 0.75) for regular day care outside the home, and 0.48 (0.37 to 0.62) for formal day care (attendance at facility with at least four children at least twice a week) (P value for trend < 0.001). Although not as striking, results for non-ALL malignancies showed a similar pattern (P value for trend < 0.001). When children with non-ALL malignancies were taken as the reference group, a significant protective effect for ALL was seen only for formal day care (odds ratio = 0.69, 0.51 to 0.93; P = 0.02). Similar results were obtained for B cell precursor common ALL and other subgroups, as well as for cases diagnosed above and below age 5 years. CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that reduced exposure to infection in the first few months of life increases the risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK Epidemiology and Genetics Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG.
Citation:
Day care in infancy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: findings from UK case-control study. 2005, 330 (7503):1294 BMJ
Journal:
BMJ
Issue Date:
4-Jun-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/75817
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.38428.521042.8F
PubMed ID:
15849205
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1468-5833
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGilham, C-
dc.contributor.authorPeto, J-
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, J-
dc.contributor.authorRoman, E-
dc.contributor.authorEden, Tim O B-
dc.contributor.authorGreaves, M-
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, F E-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-29T11:01:53Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-29T11:01:53Z-
dc.date.issued2005-06-04-
dc.identifier.citationDay care in infancy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: findings from UK case-control study. 2005, 330 (7503):1294 BMJen
dc.identifier.issn1468-5833-
dc.identifier.pmid15849205-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmj.38428.521042.8F-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/75817-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that reduced exposure to common infections in the first year of life increases the risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Design and setting The United Kingdom childhood cancer study (UKCCS) is a large population based case-control study of childhood cancer across 10 regions of the UK. PARTICIPANTS: 6305 children (aged 2-14 years) without cancer; 3140 children with cancer (diagnosed 1991-6), of whom 1286 had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Day care and social activity during the first year of life were used as proxies for potential exposure to infection in infancy. RESULTS: Increasing levels of social activity were associated with consistent reductions in risk of ALL; a dose-response trend was seen. When children whose mothers reported no regular activity outside the family were used as the reference group, odds ratios for increasing levels of activity were 0.73 (95% confidence interval 0.62 to 0.87) for any social activity, 0.62 (0.51 to 0.75) for regular day care outside the home, and 0.48 (0.37 to 0.62) for formal day care (attendance at facility with at least four children at least twice a week) (P value for trend < 0.001). Although not as striking, results for non-ALL malignancies showed a similar pattern (P value for trend < 0.001). When children with non-ALL malignancies were taken as the reference group, a significant protective effect for ALL was seen only for formal day care (odds ratio = 0.69, 0.51 to 0.93; P = 0.02). Similar results were obtained for B cell precursor common ALL and other subgroups, as well as for cases diagnosed above and below age 5 years. CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that reduced exposure to infection in the first few months of life increases the risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild Day Care Centers-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Diseases-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratio-
dc.subject.meshPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma-
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysis-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSocial Behavior-
dc.titleDay care in infancy and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: findings from UK case-control study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK Epidemiology and Genetics Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG.en
dc.identifier.journalBMJen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.