Energy balance in patients with advanced NSCLC, metastatic melanoma and metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy--a longitudinal study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/74930
Title:
Energy balance in patients with advanced NSCLC, metastatic melanoma and metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy--a longitudinal study.
Authors:
Harvie, Michelle N; Howell, Anthony ( 0000-0002-3879-5991 ) ; Thatcher, Nick; Baildam, Andrew D; Campbell, I
Abstract:
Chemotherapy exerts a variable effect on nutritional status. It is not known whether loss of body fat or fat-free mass (FFM) during chemotherapy relates to diminished dietary intake, failure to meet elevated energy requirements, or to the presence of an acute-phase response. We sought to determine prospective measurements of body mass and composition, resting energy expenditure, energy and protein intake, and C-reactive protein over a course of chemotherapy in 82 patients with advanced cancer. There was a large dropout from the study. Prospective measurements were obtained in 19 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 12 with metastatic melanoma and 10 with metastatic breast cancer. There were significant increases in energy intake among patients with metastatic breast cancer, 873 (266-1480) kJ (mean 95% CI; P<0.01), and metastatic melanoma, 2513 (523-4503) kJ (P<0.01). Breast cancer patients gained percentage body fat over the course of treatment, 2.1 (0.8-3.5%). Gain or loss of body fat correlated to mean energy intake throughout chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC (Rs=0.751; P<0.01) and metastatic breast cancer (Rs=0.617; P<0.05). The ability to meet or exceed energy requirements led to gains in body fat among patients with metastatic breast cancer and NSCLC, but did not prevent loss of FFM in these groups.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. m_harvie@fs1.with.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Energy balance in patients with advanced NSCLC, metastatic melanoma and metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy--a longitudinal study. 2005, 92 (4):673-80 Br. J. Cancer
Journal:
British Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
28-Feb-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/74930
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6602357
PubMed ID:
15726121
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0007-0920
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarvie, Michelle N-
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Anthony-
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nick-
dc.contributor.authorBaildam, Andrew D-
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, I-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-22T10:43:47Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-22T10:43:47Z-
dc.date.issued2005-02-28-
dc.identifier.citationEnergy balance in patients with advanced NSCLC, metastatic melanoma and metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy--a longitudinal study. 2005, 92 (4):673-80 Br. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920-
dc.identifier.pmid15726121-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bjc.6602357-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/74930-
dc.description.abstractChemotherapy exerts a variable effect on nutritional status. It is not known whether loss of body fat or fat-free mass (FFM) during chemotherapy relates to diminished dietary intake, failure to meet elevated energy requirements, or to the presence of an acute-phase response. We sought to determine prospective measurements of body mass and composition, resting energy expenditure, energy and protein intake, and C-reactive protein over a course of chemotherapy in 82 patients with advanced cancer. There was a large dropout from the study. Prospective measurements were obtained in 19 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 12 with metastatic melanoma and 10 with metastatic breast cancer. There were significant increases in energy intake among patients with metastatic breast cancer, 873 (266-1480) kJ (mean 95% CI; P<0.01), and metastatic melanoma, 2513 (523-4503) kJ (P<0.01). Breast cancer patients gained percentage body fat over the course of treatment, 2.1 (0.8-3.5%). Gain or loss of body fat correlated to mean energy intake throughout chemotherapy in patients with NSCLC (Rs=0.751; P<0.01) and metastatic breast cancer (Rs=0.617; P<0.05). The ability to meet or exceed energy requirements led to gains in body fat among patients with metastatic breast cancer and NSCLC, but did not prevent loss of FFM in these groups.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subjectSkin Canceren
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols-
dc.subject.meshBasal Metabolism-
dc.subject.meshBody Composition-
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung-
dc.subject.meshEnergy Intake-
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolism-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studies-
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMelanoma-
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSkin Neoplasms-
dc.titleEnergy balance in patients with advanced NSCLC, metastatic melanoma and metastatic breast cancer receiving chemotherapy--a longitudinal study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. m_harvie@fs1.with.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren
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