2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/74879
Title:
Magnetic resonance imaging of anal cancer.
Authors:
Roach, S C; Hulse, Paul; Moulding, F J; Wilson, R; Carrington, Bernadette M
Abstract:
AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of primary and recurrent anal carcinoma, and to demonstrate the commonest patterns of local and distant disease spread. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of 27 cases of biopsy-proven anal carcinoma, where MRI was used for primary staging (9 patients) or suspected recurrence (18 patients). Two oncological radiologists reviewed the MR images, following a standardized approach. The size, extent and signal characteristics of the anal tumour were documented. Metastatic disease spread to lymph nodes, viscera and bone was recorded. In all, 7 patients with recurrent disease underwent surgery and subsequent histological correlation was performed. RESULTS: Primary and recurrent tumours were of high signal intensity relative to skeletal muscle on T2-weighted images (T2WI), and of low to intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI). Lymph node metastases were of similar signal intensity to the anal cancer. Recurrent tumours were more locally advanced than primary tumours and extended into adjacent organs and the pelvic skeleton. Recurrent lymph node disease involved perirectal, presacral and internal iliac nodes more commonly than did primary lymph node disease. CONCLUSION: MRI can be useful in the primary staging of bulky tumours or of those with a long craniocaudal extent. MR has a role in the preoperative evaluation and surgical planning of cases of recurrent disease following radiotherapy.
Affiliation:
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Magnetic resonance imaging of anal cancer. 2005, 60 (10):1111-9 Clin Radiol
Journal:
Clinical Radiology
Issue Date:
Oct-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/74879
DOI:
10.1016/j.crad.2005.05.008
PubMed ID:
16179172
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0009-9260
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoach, S C-
dc.contributor.authorHulse, Paul-
dc.contributor.authorMoulding, F J-
dc.contributor.authorWilson, R-
dc.contributor.authorCarrington, Bernadette M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-22T08:58:23Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-22T08:58:23Z-
dc.date.issued2005-10-
dc.identifier.citationMagnetic resonance imaging of anal cancer. 2005, 60 (10):1111-9 Clin Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0009-9260-
dc.identifier.pmid16179172-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.crad.2005.05.008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/74879-
dc.description.abstractAIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of primary and recurrent anal carcinoma, and to demonstrate the commonest patterns of local and distant disease spread. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of 27 cases of biopsy-proven anal carcinoma, where MRI was used for primary staging (9 patients) or suspected recurrence (18 patients). Two oncological radiologists reviewed the MR images, following a standardized approach. The size, extent and signal characteristics of the anal tumour were documented. Metastatic disease spread to lymph nodes, viscera and bone was recorded. In all, 7 patients with recurrent disease underwent surgery and subsequent histological correlation was performed. RESULTS: Primary and recurrent tumours were of high signal intensity relative to skeletal muscle on T2-weighted images (T2WI), and of low to intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI). Lymph node metastases were of similar signal intensity to the anal cancer. Recurrent tumours were more locally advanced than primary tumours and extended into adjacent organs and the pelvic skeleton. Recurrent lymph node disease involved perirectal, presacral and internal iliac nodes more commonly than did primary lymph node disease. CONCLUSION: MRI can be useful in the primary staging of bulky tumours or of those with a long craniocaudal extent. MR has a role in the preoperative evaluation and surgical planning of cases of recurrent disease following radiotherapy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAnus Canceren
dc.subjectCancer Recurrenceen
dc.subjectCancer Stagingen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshAnus Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Squamous Cell-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLymphatic Metastasis-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Recurrence, Local-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.titleMagnetic resonance imaging of anal cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalClinical Radiologyen

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