How participants in cancer trials are chosen: ethics and conflicting interests.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/73081
Title:
How participants in cancer trials are chosen: ethics and conflicting interests.
Authors:
Jayson, Gordon C ( 0000-0002-8515-8944 ) ; Harris, John
Abstract:
The development of new drugs for cancer is extremely complex and expensive, and poses ethical problems. In this article we will review issues in clinical trials for cancer drugs that will cast new light on the doctor-patient relationship and their interaction with industry, the health service, academic and administrative organizations. We show that the Declaration of Helsinki cannot be applied to cancer trials as it is currently written, that patients do not and perhaps cannot give fully informed consent to participate, and that the results of clinical trials do not translate into daily practice in a way that patients might expect.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK, University of Manchester, Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. Gordon.Jayson@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk
Citation:
How participants in cancer trials are chosen: ethics and conflicting interests. 2006, 6 (4):330-6 Nat. Rev. Cancer
Journal:
Nature Reviews. Cancer
Issue Date:
Apr-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/73081
DOI:
10.1038/nrc1842
PubMed ID:
16557284
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1474-175X
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJayson, Gordon C-
dc.contributor.authorHarris, John-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-09T12:25:18Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-09T12:25:18Z-
dc.date.issued2006-04-
dc.identifier.citationHow participants in cancer trials are chosen: ethics and conflicting interests. 2006, 6 (4):330-6 Nat. Rev. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn1474-175X-
dc.identifier.pmid16557284-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nrc1842-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/73081-
dc.description.abstractThe development of new drugs for cancer is extremely complex and expensive, and poses ethical problems. In this article we will review issues in clinical trials for cancer drugs that will cast new light on the doctor-patient relationship and their interaction with industry, the health service, academic and administrative organizations. We show that the Declaration of Helsinki cannot be applied to cancer trials as it is currently written, that patients do not and perhaps cannot give fully informed consent to participate, and that the results of clinical trials do not translate into daily practice in a way that patients might expect.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials as Topic-
dc.subject.meshConflict of Interest-
dc.subject.meshEthics, Medical-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPatient Selection-
dc.titleHow participants in cancer trials are chosen: ethics and conflicting interests.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK, University of Manchester, Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. Gordon.Jayson@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalNature Reviews. Canceren
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