Distinct roles for Sld3 and GINS during establishment and progression of eukaryotic DNA replication forks.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72796
Title:
Distinct roles for Sld3 and GINS during establishment and progression of eukaryotic DNA replication forks.
Authors:
Kanemaki, Masato; Labib, Karim
Abstract:
The Cdc45 protein is crucial for the initiation of chromosome replication in eukaryotic cells, as it allows the activation of prereplication complexes (pre-RCs) that contain the MCM helicase. This causes the unwinding of origins and the establishment of DNA replication forks. The incorporation of Cdc45 at nascent forks is a highly regulated and poorly understood process that requires, in budding yeast, the Sld3 protein and the GINS complex. Previous studies suggested that Sld3 is also important for the progression of DNA replication forks after the initiation step, as are Cdc45 and GINS. In contrast, we show here that Sld3 does not move with DNA replication forks and only associates with MCM in an unstable manner before initiation. After the establishment of DNA replication forks from early origins, Sld3 is no longer essential for the completion of chromosome replication. Unlike Sld3, GINS is not required for the initial recruitment of Cdc45 to origins and instead is necessary for stable engagement of Cdc45 with the nascent replisome. Like Cdc45, GINS then associates stably with MCM during S-phase.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK.
Citation:
Distinct roles for Sld3 and GINS during establishment and progression of eukaryotic DNA replication forks. 2006, 25 (8):1753-63 EMBO J.
Journal:
The EMBO Journal
Issue Date:
19-Apr-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72796
DOI:
10.1038/sj.emboj.7601063
PubMed ID:
16601689
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0261-4189
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKanemaki, Masato-
dc.contributor.authorLabib, Karim-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-07T12:13:54Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-07T12:13:54Z-
dc.date.issued2006-04-19-
dc.identifier.citationDistinct roles for Sld3 and GINS during establishment and progression of eukaryotic DNA replication forks. 2006, 25 (8):1753-63 EMBO J.en
dc.identifier.issn0261-4189-
dc.identifier.pmid16601689-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.emboj.7601063-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/72796-
dc.description.abstractThe Cdc45 protein is crucial for the initiation of chromosome replication in eukaryotic cells, as it allows the activation of prereplication complexes (pre-RCs) that contain the MCM helicase. This causes the unwinding of origins and the establishment of DNA replication forks. The incorporation of Cdc45 at nascent forks is a highly regulated and poorly understood process that requires, in budding yeast, the Sld3 protein and the GINS complex. Previous studies suggested that Sld3 is also important for the progression of DNA replication forks after the initiation step, as are Cdc45 and GINS. In contrast, we show here that Sld3 does not move with DNA replication forks and only associates with MCM in an unstable manner before initiation. After the establishment of DNA replication forks from early origins, Sld3 is no longer essential for the completion of chromosome replication. Unlike Sld3, GINS is not required for the initial recruitment of Cdc45 to origins and instead is necessary for stable engagement of Cdc45 with the nascent replisome. Like Cdc45, GINS then associates stably with MCM during S-phase.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshCell Cycle Proteins-
dc.subject.meshChromosomes, Fungal-
dc.subject.meshDNA Helicases-
dc.subject.meshDNA Replication-
dc.subject.meshDNA-Binding Proteins-
dc.subject.meshNuclear Proteins-
dc.subject.meshReplication Origin-
dc.subject.meshSaccharomyces cerevisiae-
dc.subject.meshSaccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins-
dc.titleDistinct roles for Sld3 and GINS during establishment and progression of eukaryotic DNA replication forks.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe EMBO Journalen

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