High resolution analysis of mammalian nuclear structure throughout the cell cycle: implications for nuclear pore complex assembly during interphase and mitosis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72745
Title:
High resolution analysis of mammalian nuclear structure throughout the cell cycle: implications for nuclear pore complex assembly during interphase and mitosis.
Authors:
Drummond, Sheona P; Rutherford, Sandra A; Sanderson, Helen S; Allen, Terence D
Abstract:
Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are the gateways for both active and passive bidirectional molecular transport between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. These mega-dalton assemblies are composed of multiple copies of approximately 30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Higher eukaryotes display an "open" mitosis in which the NPCs, nuclear envelope, and lamina disassemble. During mitosis several nucleoporins are redistributed to kinetochores until they are recruited back to the periphery of chromatin as the NPCs are reassembled. Within this study we have developed and optimized the visualization of mammalian cells and their chromosome profiles throughout the cell-cycle. Close attention has been paid to the preservation of chromatin, membranes, and NPC structure to investigate the ultrastructural locations of specific proteins in both interphase and mitosis.
Affiliation:
Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
High resolution analysis of mammalian nuclear structure throughout the cell cycle: implications for nuclear pore complex assembly during interphase and mitosis., 84 (3-4):423-30 Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol.
Journal:
Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72745
DOI:
10.1139/y05-148
PubMed ID:
16902587
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0008-4212
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDrummond, Sheona P-
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Sandra A-
dc.contributor.authorSanderson, Helen S-
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Terence D-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-07T11:56:14Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-07T11:56:14Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationHigh resolution analysis of mammalian nuclear structure throughout the cell cycle: implications for nuclear pore complex assembly during interphase and mitosis., 84 (3-4):423-30 Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol.en
dc.identifier.issn0008-4212-
dc.identifier.pmid16902587-
dc.identifier.doi10.1139/y05-148-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/72745-
dc.description.abstractNuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are the gateways for both active and passive bidirectional molecular transport between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. These mega-dalton assemblies are composed of multiple copies of approximately 30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Higher eukaryotes display an "open" mitosis in which the NPCs, nuclear envelope, and lamina disassemble. During mitosis several nucleoporins are redistributed to kinetochores until they are recruited back to the periphery of chromatin as the NPCs are reassembled. Within this study we have developed and optimized the visualization of mammalian cells and their chromosome profiles throughout the cell-cycle. Close attention has been paid to the preservation of chromatin, membranes, and NPC structure to investigate the ultrastructural locations of specific proteins in both interphase and mitosis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshChromosomes-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInterphase-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanning-
dc.subject.meshMitosis-
dc.subject.meshNuclear Pore-
dc.titleHigh resolution analysis of mammalian nuclear structure throughout the cell cycle: implications for nuclear pore complex assembly during interphase and mitosis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPaterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalCanadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacologyen

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