Screening younger women with a family history of breast cancer--does early detection improve outcome?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72656
Title:
Screening younger women with a family history of breast cancer--does early detection improve outcome?
Authors:
Maurice, Andrew; Evans, D Gareth R; Shenton, Andrew; Ashcroft, Linda; Baildam, Andrew D; Barr, Lester; Byrne, Ged J; Bundred, Nigel J; Boggis, C; Wilson, M; Duffy, Stephen W; Howell, Anthony ( 0000-0002-3879-5991 )
Abstract:
Women with a family history are often offered mammographic surveillance at an earlier age and with greater frequency than those in the National Breast Screening Programme. In this study, we compared the survival of 62 breast cancer patients diagnosed in the context of a family history clinic offering 12-18 monthly mammographic screening with that of 1108 patients of the same age range but having no exposure to screening. We subtracted the expected additional observation time due to lead time from the survival of the screen-detected cases. Survival was significantly better in the family history group with relative hazards of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07-0.52, P<0.001) for breast cancer death and 0.19 (95% CI 0.08-0.43, P<0.001) for disease-free survival. After correcting for lead-time, the relative hazards were 0.24 (95% CI 0.09-0.66, P=0.005) for breast cancer death and 0.25 (95% CI 0.11-0.57, P<0.001) for disease-free survival. These results strongly suggest that screening younger women with a family history of breast cancer leads to improved survival. More precise estimates of the benefit will accrue from further follow-up and other such studies.
Affiliation:
Breast Cancer Family History Clinic, Nightingale Centre, Withington Hospital, South Manchester University Hospital Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Screening younger women with a family history of breast cancer--does early detection improve outcome? 2006, 42 (10):1385-90 Eur. J. Cancer
Journal:
European Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
Jul-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72656
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejca.2006.01.055
PubMed ID:
16750910
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0959-8049
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaurice, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorEvans, D Gareth R-
dc.contributor.authorShenton, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorAshcroft, Linda-
dc.contributor.authorBaildam, Andrew D-
dc.contributor.authorBarr, Lester-
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Ged J-
dc.contributor.authorBundred, Nigel J-
dc.contributor.authorBoggis, C-
dc.contributor.authorWilson, M-
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Stephen W-
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Anthony-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-06T16:52:30Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-06T16:52:30Z-
dc.date.issued2006-07-
dc.identifier.citationScreening younger women with a family history of breast cancer--does early detection improve outcome? 2006, 42 (10):1385-90 Eur. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0959-8049-
dc.identifier.pmid16750910-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejca.2006.01.055-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/72656-
dc.description.abstractWomen with a family history are often offered mammographic surveillance at an earlier age and with greater frequency than those in the National Breast Screening Programme. In this study, we compared the survival of 62 breast cancer patients diagnosed in the context of a family history clinic offering 12-18 monthly mammographic screening with that of 1108 patients of the same age range but having no exposure to screening. We subtracted the expected additional observation time due to lead time from the survival of the screen-detected cases. Survival was significantly better in the family history group with relative hazards of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07-0.52, P<0.001) for breast cancer death and 0.19 (95% CI 0.08-0.43, P<0.001) for disease-free survival. After correcting for lead-time, the relative hazards were 0.24 (95% CI 0.09-0.66, P=0.005) for breast cancer death and 0.25 (95% CI 0.11-0.57, P<0.001) for disease-free survival. These results strongly suggest that screening younger women with a family history of breast cancer leads to improved survival. More precise estimates of the benefit will accrue from further follow-up and other such studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshEarly Diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGenes, BRCA1-
dc.subject.meshGenes, BRCA2-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Screening-
dc.subject.meshHeterozygote-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMammography-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPedigree-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleScreening younger women with a family history of breast cancer--does early detection improve outcome?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBreast Cancer Family History Clinic, Nightingale Centre, Withington Hospital, South Manchester University Hospital Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Canceren

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