Human peritoneal adhesions show evidence of tissue remodeling and markers of angiogenesis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72644
Title:
Human peritoneal adhesions show evidence of tissue remodeling and markers of angiogenesis.
Authors:
Epstein, Jonathan C; Wilson, Malcolm S; Wilkosz, Sylwia; Ireland, Grenham; O'Dwyer, Sarah T; Herrick, Sarah E
Abstract:
PURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate the vascular structure and angiogenic activity of human peritoneal adhesions. METHODS: Adhesions were collected from patients undergoing laparotomy (n=32). Histologic features were documented and the distribution of mature and immature vascular markers were determined by immunolocalization and quantified by image analysis. The three-dimensional organization of blood vessels was investigated by confocal microscopy. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A, its receptor flk-1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were assessed by immunohistochemistry as indicators of angiogenic activity. RESULTS: Adhesions were found to be vascularized structures comprising bundles of collagen, interspersed with varying amounts of adipose tissue. Functional blood vessels expressed recognized vascular markers (vWF, CD34, alpha-SMA, and CD105) and formed a branching network similar to that of the peritoneum. Those adhesions expressing vascular endothelial growth factor A and its receptor showed significantly higher numbers of immature vessels as defined by expression of CD105. Omental adhesions (n=16) contained significantly more adipose tissue (P<0.05) and displayed a higher microvessel density (P<0.01) but lower cellularity (P<0.05) compared with nonomental adhesions (n=16). CONCLUSIONS: All adhesions contained functional blood vessels and most showed evidence of cell proliferation. The presence of vascular endothelial growth factor A and its receptor in human adhesions suggests ongoing angiogenic activity. This study demonstrates that adhesions are vascular structures with evidence of tissue remodeling and suggests potential for new prevention strategies involving antiangiogenic therapies.
Affiliation:
Faculty of Life Sciences, The University of Manchester, and Department of Surgery, Christie Hospital, Manchester, M13 9PT, United Kingdom.
Citation:
Human peritoneal adhesions show evidence of tissue remodeling and markers of angiogenesis. 2006, 49 (12):1885-92 Dis. Colon Rectum
Journal:
Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
Issue Date:
Dec-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72644
DOI:
10.1007/s10350-006-0747-3
PubMed ID:
17096176
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0012-3706
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEpstein, Jonathan C-
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Malcolm S-
dc.contributor.authorWilkosz, Sylwia-
dc.contributor.authorIreland, Grenham-
dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, Sarah T-
dc.contributor.authorHerrick, Sarah E-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-06T16:18:25Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-06T16:18:25Z-
dc.date.issued2006-12-
dc.identifier.citationHuman peritoneal adhesions show evidence of tissue remodeling and markers of angiogenesis. 2006, 49 (12):1885-92 Dis. Colon Rectumen
dc.identifier.issn0012-3706-
dc.identifier.pmid17096176-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10350-006-0747-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/72644-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: This study was designed to investigate the vascular structure and angiogenic activity of human peritoneal adhesions. METHODS: Adhesions were collected from patients undergoing laparotomy (n=32). Histologic features were documented and the distribution of mature and immature vascular markers were determined by immunolocalization and quantified by image analysis. The three-dimensional organization of blood vessels was investigated by confocal microscopy. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A, its receptor flk-1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were assessed by immunohistochemistry as indicators of angiogenic activity. RESULTS: Adhesions were found to be vascularized structures comprising bundles of collagen, interspersed with varying amounts of adipose tissue. Functional blood vessels expressed recognized vascular markers (vWF, CD34, alpha-SMA, and CD105) and formed a branching network similar to that of the peritoneum. Those adhesions expressing vascular endothelial growth factor A and its receptor showed significantly higher numbers of immature vessels as defined by expression of CD105. Omental adhesions (n=16) contained significantly more adipose tissue (P<0.05) and displayed a higher microvessel density (P<0.01) but lower cellularity (P<0.05) compared with nonomental adhesions (n=16). CONCLUSIONS: All adhesions contained functional blood vessels and most showed evidence of cell proliferation. The presence of vascular endothelial growth factor A and its receptor in human adhesions suggests ongoing angiogenic activity. This study demonstrates that adhesions are vascular structures with evidence of tissue remodeling and suggests potential for new prevention strategies involving antiangiogenic therapies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdipose Tissue-
dc.subject.meshAlkaline Phosphatase-
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD-
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshBlood Vessels-
dc.subject.meshCell Proliferation-
dc.subject.meshCollagen-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistry-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Confocal-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Physiologic-
dc.subject.meshPeritoneum-
dc.subject.meshProliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen-
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Cell Surface-
dc.subject.meshTissue Adhesions-
dc.subject.meshVascular Endothelial Growth Factor A-
dc.subject.meshVascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2-
dc.titleHuman peritoneal adhesions show evidence of tissue remodeling and markers of angiogenesis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Life Sciences, The University of Manchester, and Department of Surgery, Christie Hospital, Manchester, M13 9PT, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalDiseases of the Colon and Rectumen

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