2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72539
Title:
Hysterectomy.
Authors:
Clayton, Richard D
Abstract:
Hysterectomy is one of the most commonly performed major surgical procedures; approximately 100,000 are performed in the UK each year. Hysterectomy can be total or subtotal. The postulated benefits of subtotal hysterectomy--better pelvic floor and sexual function--have not been confirmed in randomised trials. Traditionally, hysterectomy was performed using either an abdominal or vaginal approach. More recently, laparoscopic techniques have been used. The decision about the technique used is often related to the surgeon's training and expertise, as the indications for each technique overlap. Vaginal hysterectomy is probably the preferred route because it is quicker and cheaper than laparoscopic hysterectomy, with no other clear differences in outcome measures. Laparoscopic hysterectomy has a number of advantages over abdominal hysterectomy: specifically, shorter hospital stay and quicker return to normal activities; complication rates, however, appear to be greater. This also seems to be the case with radical hysterectomy performed for cervical cancer.
Affiliation:
St Mary's Hospital, Whitworth Park, Manchester and Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. richard.clayton@cmmc.nhs.uk
Citation:
Hysterectomy. 2006, 20 (1):73-87 Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol
Journal:
Best Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Issue Date:
Feb-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/72539
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2005.09.007
PubMed ID:
16275095
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1521-6934
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Richard D-
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-06T10:33:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-07-06T10:33:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006-02-
dc.identifier.citationHysterectomy. 2006, 20 (1):73-87 Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecolen
dc.identifier.issn1521-6934-
dc.identifier.pmid16275095-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2005.09.007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/72539-
dc.description.abstractHysterectomy is one of the most commonly performed major surgical procedures; approximately 100,000 are performed in the UK each year. Hysterectomy can be total or subtotal. The postulated benefits of subtotal hysterectomy--better pelvic floor and sexual function--have not been confirmed in randomised trials. Traditionally, hysterectomy was performed using either an abdominal or vaginal approach. More recently, laparoscopic techniques have been used. The decision about the technique used is often related to the surgeon's training and expertise, as the indications for each technique overlap. Vaginal hysterectomy is probably the preferred route because it is quicker and cheaper than laparoscopic hysterectomy, with no other clear differences in outcome measures. Laparoscopic hysterectomy has a number of advantages over abdominal hysterectomy: specifically, shorter hospital stay and quicker return to normal activities; complication rates, however, appear to be greater. This also seems to be the case with radical hysterectomy performed for cervical cancer.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdnexa Uteri-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHysterectomy-
dc.subject.meshHysterectomy, Vaginal-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy-
dc.subject.meshOvariectomy-
dc.titleHysterectomy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSt Mary's Hospital, Whitworth Park, Manchester and Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. richard.clayton@cmmc.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalBest Practice & Research. Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecologyen

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