Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and infections in the first year of life: a report from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/71981
Title:
Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and infections in the first year of life: a report from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study.
Authors:
Roman, Eve; Simpson, Jill; Ansell, Pat; Kinsey, Sally E; Mitchell, Christopher D; McKinney, Patricia A; Birch, Jillian M; Greaves, Martin J; Eden, Tim O B
Abstract:
The United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study was designed to examine the relation between childhood cancer and preceding exposure to infectious diseases. The authors analyzed the relation between diagnosis (1991-1996) of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at ages 2-5 years and clinically diagnosed infections in infancy. Almost all study children (96% of both cases and controls) were taken to a general practitioner for a non-immunization-associated visit at least once before their first birthday. Children diagnosed with ALL had significantly more clinically diagnosed infectious episodes in infancy than did controls; the average number of episodes was 3.6 (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3, 3.9) versus 3.1 (95% CI: 2.9, 3.2). This case-control difference was most apparent in the neonatal period (< or =1 month); 18% of controls and 24% of ALL cases were diagnosed with at least one infection (odds ratio = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.9; p < 0.05). Cases who had more than one neonatal infectious episode tended to be diagnosed with ALL at a comparatively young age; the mean age at ALL diagnosis was 37.7 months for cases with two or more episodes versus 45.3 months for cases with only one episode or none (p < 0.01). These findings support the hypothesis that a dysregulated immune response to infection in the first few months of life promotes transition to overt ALL later in childhood.
Affiliation:
Epidemiology and Genetics Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom. eve.roman@egu.york.ac.uk
Citation:
Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and infections in the first year of life: a report from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study. 2007, 165 (5):496-504 Am. J. Epidemiol.
Journal:
American Journal of Epidemiology
Issue Date:
1-Mar-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/71981
DOI:
10.1093/aje/kwk039
PubMed ID:
17182983
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0002-9262
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoman, Eve-
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Jill-
dc.contributor.authorAnsell, Pat-
dc.contributor.authorKinsey, Sally E-
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Christopher D-
dc.contributor.authorMcKinney, Patricia A-
dc.contributor.authorBirch, Jillian M-
dc.contributor.authorGreaves, Martin J-
dc.contributor.authorEden, Tim O B-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-30T14:30:39Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-30T14:30:39Z-
dc.date.issued2007-03-01-
dc.identifier.citationChildhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and infections in the first year of life: a report from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study. 2007, 165 (5):496-504 Am. J. Epidemiol.en
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262-
dc.identifier.pmid17182983-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwk039-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/71981-
dc.description.abstractThe United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study was designed to examine the relation between childhood cancer and preceding exposure to infectious diseases. The authors analyzed the relation between diagnosis (1991-1996) of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at ages 2-5 years and clinically diagnosed infections in infancy. Almost all study children (96% of both cases and controls) were taken to a general practitioner for a non-immunization-associated visit at least once before their first birthday. Children diagnosed with ALL had significantly more clinically diagnosed infectious episodes in infancy than did controls; the average number of episodes was 3.6 (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3, 3.9) versus 3.1 (95% CI: 2.9, 3.2). This case-control difference was most apparent in the neonatal period (< or =1 month); 18% of controls and 24% of ALL cases were diagnosed with at least one infection (odds ratio = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.9; p < 0.05). Cases who had more than one neonatal infectious episode tended to be diagnosed with ALL at a comparatively young age; the mean age at ALL diagnosis was 37.7 months for cases with two or more episodes versus 45.3 months for cases with only one episode or none (p < 0.01). These findings support the hypothesis that a dysregulated immune response to infection in the first few months of life promotes transition to overt ALL later in childhood.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAge of Onset-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervals-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshInfection-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratio-
dc.subject.meshPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.titleChildhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and infections in the first year of life: a report from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEpidemiology and Genetics Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, York, United Kingdom. eve.roman@egu.york.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen

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