A microarray study of gene and protein regulation in human and rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/71922
Title:
A microarray study of gene and protein regulation in human and rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion.
Authors:
Mitsios, Nick; Saka, Mohamad; Krupinski, Jerzy; Pennucci, Roberta; Sanfeliu, Coral; Wang, Qiuyu; Rubio, Francisco; Gaffney, John; Kumar, Patricia; Kumar, Shant; Sullivan, Matthew; Slevin, Mark
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Altered gene expression is an important feature of ischemic cerebral injury and affects proteins of many functional classes. We have used microarrays to investigate the changes in gene expression at various times after middle cerebral artery occlusion in human and rat brain. RESULTS: Our results demonstrated a significant difference in the number of genes affected and the time-course of expression between the two cases. The total number of deregulated genes in the rat was 335 versus 126 in the human, while, of 393 overlapping genes between the two array sets, 184 were changed only in the rat and 36 in the human with a total of 41 genes deregulated in both cases. Interestingly, the mean fold changes were much higher in the human. The expression of novel genes, including p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP11) and integrase interactor 1, was further analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Strong neuronal staining was seen for PAK1 and MMP11. CONCLUSION: Our findings confirmed previous studies reporting that gene expression screening can detect known and unknown transcriptional features of stroke and highlight the importance of research using human brain tissue in the search for novel therapeutic agents.
Affiliation:
School of Biology, Chemistry and Health Science, John Dalton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester, UK. n.mitsios@mmu.ac.uk
Citation:
A microarray study of gene and protein regulation in human and rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion. 2007, 8:93 BMC Neurosci
Journal:
BMC Neuroscience
Issue Date:
Nov-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/71922
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2202-8-93
PubMed ID:
17997827
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1471-2202
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMitsios, Nick-
dc.contributor.authorSaka, Mohamad-
dc.contributor.authorKrupinski, Jerzy-
dc.contributor.authorPennucci, Roberta-
dc.contributor.authorSanfeliu, Coral-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Qiuyu-
dc.contributor.authorRubio, Francisco-
dc.contributor.authorGaffney, John-
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Patricia-
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Shant-
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Matthew-
dc.contributor.authorSlevin, Mark-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-30T11:40:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-30T11:40:03Z-
dc.date.issued2007-11-
dc.identifier.citationA microarray study of gene and protein regulation in human and rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion. 2007, 8:93 BMC Neuroscien
dc.identifier.issn1471-2202-
dc.identifier.pmid17997827-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2202-8-93-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/71922-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Altered gene expression is an important feature of ischemic cerebral injury and affects proteins of many functional classes. We have used microarrays to investigate the changes in gene expression at various times after middle cerebral artery occlusion in human and rat brain. RESULTS: Our results demonstrated a significant difference in the number of genes affected and the time-course of expression between the two cases. The total number of deregulated genes in the rat was 335 versus 126 in the human, while, of 393 overlapping genes between the two array sets, 184 were changed only in the rat and 36 in the human with a total of 41 genes deregulated in both cases. Interestingly, the mean fold changes were much higher in the human. The expression of novel genes, including p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1), matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP11) and integrase interactor 1, was further analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Strong neuronal staining was seen for PAK1 and MMP11. CONCLUSION: Our findings confirmed previous studies reporting that gene expression screening can detect known and unknown transcriptional features of stroke and highlight the importance of research using human brain tissue in the search for novel therapeutic agents.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectFoetusen
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAnoxia-
dc.subject.meshBrain-
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultured-
dc.subject.meshChromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone-
dc.subject.meshDNA-Binding Proteins-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFetus-
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulation-
dc.subject.meshGlucose-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfarction, Middle Cerebral Artery-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMatrix Metalloproteinase 11-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawley-
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction-
dc.subject.meshStroke-
dc.subject.meshTranscription Factors-
dc.subject.meshp21-Activated Kinases-
dc.titleA microarray study of gene and protein regulation in human and rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Biology, Chemistry and Health Science, John Dalton Building, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester, UK. n.mitsios@mmu.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalBMC Neuroscienceen

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