2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/71333
Title:
Cdc14-regulated midzone assembly controls anaphase B
Authors:
Khmelinskii, Anton; Lawrence, Clare L; Roostalu, Johanna; Schiebel, Elmar
Abstract:
Spindle elongation in anaphase of mitosis is a cell cycle-regulated process that requires coordination between polymerization, cross-linking, and sliding of microtubules (MTs). Proteins that assemble at the spindle midzone may be important for this process. In this study, we show that Ase1 and the separase-Slk19 complex drive midzone assembly in yeast. Whereas the conserved MT-bundling protein Ase1 establishes a midzone, separase-Slk19 is required to focus and center midzone components. An important step leading to spindle midzone assembly is the dephosphorylation of Ase1 by the protein phosphatase Cdc14 at the beginning of anaphase. Failure to dephosphorylate Ase1 delocalizes midzone proteins and delays the second, slower phase of anaphase B. In contrast, in cells expressing nonphosphorylated Ase1, anaphase spindle extension is faster, and spindles frequently break. Cdc14 also controls the separase-Slk19 complex indirectly via the Aurora B kinase. Thus, Cdc14 regulates spindle midzone assembly and function directly through Ase1 and indirectly via the separase-Slk19 complex.
Affiliation:
Zentrum für Molekulare Biologie der Universität Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
Citation:
Cdc14-regulated midzone assembly controls anaphase B. 2007, 177 (6):981-93 J. Cell Biol.
Journal:
The Journal of Cell Biology
Issue Date:
18-Jun-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/71333
DOI:
10.1083/jcb.200702145
PubMed ID:
17562791
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0021-9525
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKhmelinskii, Anton-
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Clare L-
dc.contributor.authorRoostalu, Johanna-
dc.contributor.authorSchiebel, Elmar-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-23T15:27:21Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-23T15:27:21Z-
dc.date.issued2007-06-18-
dc.identifier.citationCdc14-regulated midzone assembly controls anaphase B. 2007, 177 (6):981-93 J. Cell Biol.en
dc.identifier.issn0021-9525-
dc.identifier.pmid17562791-
dc.identifier.doi10.1083/jcb.200702145-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/71333-
dc.description.abstractSpindle elongation in anaphase of mitosis is a cell cycle-regulated process that requires coordination between polymerization, cross-linking, and sliding of microtubules (MTs). Proteins that assemble at the spindle midzone may be important for this process. In this study, we show that Ase1 and the separase-Slk19 complex drive midzone assembly in yeast. Whereas the conserved MT-bundling protein Ase1 establishes a midzone, separase-Slk19 is required to focus and center midzone components. An important step leading to spindle midzone assembly is the dephosphorylation of Ase1 by the protein phosphatase Cdc14 at the beginning of anaphase. Failure to dephosphorylate Ase1 delocalizes midzone proteins and delays the second, slower phase of anaphase B. In contrast, in cells expressing nonphosphorylated Ase1, anaphase spindle extension is faster, and spindles frequently break. Cdc14 also controls the separase-Slk19 complex indirectly via the Aurora B kinase. Thus, Cdc14 regulates spindle midzone assembly and function directly through Ase1 and indirectly via the separase-Slk19 complex.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnaphase-
dc.subject.meshCell Cycle Proteins-
dc.subject.meshEndopeptidases-
dc.subject.meshMicrotubule-Associated Proteins-
dc.subject.meshMitotic Spindle Apparatus-
dc.subject.meshMultiprotein Complexes-
dc.subject.meshPhosphoprotein Phosphatases-
dc.subject.meshPhosphorylation-
dc.subject.meshSchizosaccharomyces-
dc.subject.meshSchizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins-
dc.titleCdc14-regulated midzone assembly controls anaphase Ben
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentZentrum für Molekulare Biologie der Universität Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Cell Biologyen

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