Organ-specific effects of oxygen and carbogen gas inhalation on tissue longitudinal relaxation times.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70459
Title:
Organ-specific effects of oxygen and carbogen gas inhalation on tissue longitudinal relaxation times.
Authors:
O'Connor, James P B; Jackson, Alan; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A; Buckley, David L; Roberts, Caleb; Watson, Yvonne; Cheung, Susan; McGrath, Deirdre M; Naish, Josephine H; Rose, Chris J; Dark, Paul M; Jayson, Gordon C ( 0000-0002-8515-8944 ) ; Parker, Geoff J M
Abstract:
Molecular oxygen has been previously shown to shorten longitudinal relaxation time (T1) in the spleen and renal cortex, but not in the liver or fat. In this study, the magnitude and temporal evolution of this effect were investigated. Medical air, oxygen, and carbogen (95% oxygen/5% CO2) were administered sequentially in 16 healthy volunteers. T1 maps were acquired using spoiled gradient echo sequences (TR=3.5 ms, TE=0.9 ms, alpha=2 degrees/8 degrees/17 degrees) with six acquisitions on air, 12 on oxygen, 12 on carbogen, and six to 12 back on air. Mean T1 values and change in relaxation rate were compared between each phase of gas inhalation in the liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, renal cortex, and fat by one-way analysis of variance. Oxygen-induced T1-shortening occurred in the liver in fasted subjects (P<0.001) but not in non-fasted subjects (P=0.244). T1-shortening in spleen and renal cortex (both P<0.001) were greater than previously reported. Carbogen induced conflicting responses in different organs, suggesting a complex relationship with organ vasculature. Shortening of tissue T1 by oxygen is more pronounced and more complex than previously recognized. The effect may be useful as a biomarker of arterial flow and oxygen delivery to vascular beds.
Affiliation:
Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, and Cancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. james.o'connor@manchester.ac.uk
Citation:
Organ-specific effects of oxygen and carbogen gas inhalation on tissue longitudinal relaxation times. 2007, 58 (3):490-6 Magn Reson Med
Journal:
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
Issue Date:
Sep-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70459
DOI:
10.1002/mrm.21357
PubMed ID:
17763345
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0740-3194
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, James P B-
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Alan-
dc.contributor.authorBuonaccorsi, Giovanni A-
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, David L-
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Caleb-
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Yvonne-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Susan-
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, Deirdre M-
dc.contributor.authorNaish, Josephine H-
dc.contributor.authorRose, Chris J-
dc.contributor.authorDark, Paul M-
dc.contributor.authorJayson, Gordon C-
dc.contributor.authorParker, Geoff J M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-15T11:39:24Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-15T11:39:24Z-
dc.date.issued2007-09-
dc.identifier.citationOrgan-specific effects of oxygen and carbogen gas inhalation on tissue longitudinal relaxation times. 2007, 58 (3):490-6 Magn Reson Meden
dc.identifier.issn0740-3194-
dc.identifier.pmid17763345-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mrm.21357-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/70459-
dc.description.abstractMolecular oxygen has been previously shown to shorten longitudinal relaxation time (T1) in the spleen and renal cortex, but not in the liver or fat. In this study, the magnitude and temporal evolution of this effect were investigated. Medical air, oxygen, and carbogen (95% oxygen/5% CO2) were administered sequentially in 16 healthy volunteers. T1 maps were acquired using spoiled gradient echo sequences (TR=3.5 ms, TE=0.9 ms, alpha=2 degrees/8 degrees/17 degrees) with six acquisitions on air, 12 on oxygen, 12 on carbogen, and six to 12 back on air. Mean T1 values and change in relaxation rate were compared between each phase of gas inhalation in the liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, renal cortex, and fat by one-way analysis of variance. Oxygen-induced T1-shortening occurred in the liver in fasted subjects (P<0.001) but not in non-fasted subjects (P=0.244). T1-shortening in spleen and renal cortex (both P<0.001) were greater than previously reported. Carbogen induced conflicting responses in different organs, suggesting a complex relationship with organ vasculature. Shortening of tissue T1 by oxygen is more pronounced and more complex than previously recognized. The effect may be useful as a biomarker of arterial flow and oxygen delivery to vascular beds.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAbdomen-
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Inhalation-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshArteries-
dc.subject.meshCarbon Dioxide-
dc.subject.meshFasting-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImage Enhancement-
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted-
dc.subject.meshImaging, Three-Dimensional-
dc.subject.meshKidney Cortex-
dc.subject.meshLiver-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletal-
dc.subject.meshOxygen-
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumption-
dc.subject.meshRegional Blood Flow-
dc.subject.meshSpleen-
dc.subject.meshSubcutaneous Fat, Abdominal-
dc.titleOrgan-specific effects of oxygen and carbogen gas inhalation on tissue longitudinal relaxation times.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentImaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, and Cancer Research UK Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. james.o'connor@manchester.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalMagnetic Resonance in Medicineen

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