2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70377
Title:
Mammary development, carcinomas and progesterone: role of Wnt signalling.
Authors:
Lamb, Rebecca; Harrison, Hannah; Clarke, Robert B
Abstract:
The mammary gland begins development during embryogenesis but after exposure to hormonal changes during puberty and pregnancy undergoes extensive further development. Hormonal changes are key regulators in the cycles of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and remodelling associated with pregnancy, lactation and involution following weaning. These developmental processes within the breast epithelium can be explained by the presence of a long-lived population of tissue-specific stem cells. The longevity of these stem cells makes them susceptible to accumulating genetic change and consequent transformation. The ovarian steroid progesterone, acting via the secreted factor Wnt4, is known to be essential for side branching of the mammary gland. One function of Wnt proteins is self-renewal of adult tissue stem cells, suggesting that progesterone may exert its effects within the breast, at least partly, by regulating the mammary stem cell population.
Affiliation:
Breast Biology Group, Cancer Studies, University of Manchester, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, M20 4BX Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Mammary development, carcinomas and progesterone: role of Wnt signalling. 2007 (1):1-23 Ernst Schering Found Symp Proc
Journal:
Ernst Schering Foundation Symposium Proceedings
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70377
PubMed ID:
18543432
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Rebecca-
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Hannah-
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Robert B-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-12T14:21:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-12T14:21:03Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationMammary development, carcinomas and progesterone: role of Wnt signalling. 2007 (1):1-23 Ernst Schering Found Symp Procen
dc.identifier.pmid18543432-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/70377-
dc.description.abstractThe mammary gland begins development during embryogenesis but after exposure to hormonal changes during puberty and pregnancy undergoes extensive further development. Hormonal changes are key regulators in the cycles of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and remodelling associated with pregnancy, lactation and involution following weaning. These developmental processes within the breast epithelium can be explained by the presence of a long-lived population of tissue-specific stem cells. The longevity of these stem cells makes them susceptible to accumulating genetic change and consequent transformation. The ovarian steroid progesterone, acting via the secreted factor Wnt4, is known to be essential for side branching of the mammary gland. One function of Wnt proteins is self-renewal of adult tissue stem cells, suggesting that progesterone may exert its effects within the breast, at least partly, by regulating the mammary stem cell population.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectMammary Canceren
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMammary Glands, Human-
dc.subject.meshMammary Neoplasms, Animal-
dc.subject.meshProgesterone-
dc.subject.meshSignal Transduction-
dc.subject.meshStem Cells-
dc.subject.meshWnt Proteins-
dc.titleMammary development, carcinomas and progesterone: role of Wnt signalling.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBreast Biology Group, Cancer Studies, University of Manchester, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, M20 4BX Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalErnst Schering Foundation Symposium Proceedingsen

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