Subsidized complementary therapies for staff and volunteers at a regional cancer centre: a formative study.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70222
Title:
Subsidized complementary therapies for staff and volunteers at a regional cancer centre: a formative study.
Authors:
Wilson, Katherine S; Ganley, Angela; Mackereth, Peter A; Rowswell, V
Abstract:
In the United Kingdom, the Government has acknowledged workplace stress and burnout in the National Health Service by establishing Improving Working Lives Standards, which recognize the need for a range of support mechanisms. Staff in oncology hospitals experience considerable stress because of the emotional intensity of work that involves limited clinical success, sustained contact with seriously ill/dying people, and serial bereavement. Evidence suggests that providing complementary therapies at work can help to reduce anxiety, depression and blood pressure and, thus, increase well-being. We used a purpose-designed questionnaire to assess awareness of, access to and the value placed on a complementary therapy service for staff and volunteers at a regional cancer centre. Free-text data from 167 completed questionnaires, subjected to qualitative analysis, revealed an overwhelmingly positive view of the service, but concerns about access. The service appeared to be a victim of its own success in that it could not meet demand within its existing resources and, thus, meet its potential for improving working lives; limits to resources also affected the conduct and rigour of our evaluation. We conclude by discussing the impact of the evidence-based practice culture on levels of funding for complementary therapy services operating in hospital settings.
Affiliation:
kate.wilson@manchester.ac.uk
Citation:
Subsidized complementary therapies for staff and volunteers at a regional cancer centre: a formative study. 2007, 16 (3):291-9 Eur J Cancer Care
Journal:
European Journal of Cancer Care
Issue Date:
May-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70222
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2354.2006.00751.x
PubMed ID:
17508952
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0961-5423
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Katherine S-
dc.contributor.authorGanley, Angela-
dc.contributor.authorMackereth, Peter A-
dc.contributor.authorRowswell, V-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-11T14:08:49Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-11T14:08:49Z-
dc.date.issued2007-05-
dc.identifier.citationSubsidized complementary therapies for staff and volunteers at a regional cancer centre: a formative study. 2007, 16 (3):291-9 Eur J Cancer Careen
dc.identifier.issn0961-5423-
dc.identifier.pmid17508952-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2354.2006.00751.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/70222-
dc.description.abstractIn the United Kingdom, the Government has acknowledged workplace stress and burnout in the National Health Service by establishing Improving Working Lives Standards, which recognize the need for a range of support mechanisms. Staff in oncology hospitals experience considerable stress because of the emotional intensity of work that involves limited clinical success, sustained contact with seriously ill/dying people, and serial bereavement. Evidence suggests that providing complementary therapies at work can help to reduce anxiety, depression and blood pressure and, thus, increase well-being. We used a purpose-designed questionnaire to assess awareness of, access to and the value placed on a complementary therapy service for staff and volunteers at a regional cancer centre. Free-text data from 167 completed questionnaires, subjected to qualitative analysis, revealed an overwhelmingly positive view of the service, but concerns about access. The service appeared to be a victim of its own success in that it could not meet demand within its existing resources and, thus, meet its potential for improving working lives; limits to resources also affected the conduct and rigour of our evaluation. We conclude by discussing the impact of the evidence-based practice culture on levels of funding for complementary therapy services operating in hospital settings.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Nursingen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBurnout, Professional-
dc.subject.meshComplementary Therapies-
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMedical Staff-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshMotivation-
dc.subject.meshOncologic Nursing-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.subject.meshVoluntary Workers-
dc.titleSubsidized complementary therapies for staff and volunteers at a regional cancer centre: a formative study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentkate.wilson@manchester.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Cancer Careen

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