Journal usage in NHS hospitals: a comparison report of total usage at an acute NHS Trust and a specialist NHS Trust in the North West of England.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70173
Title:
Journal usage in NHS hospitals: a comparison report of total usage at an acute NHS Trust and a specialist NHS Trust in the North West of England.
Authors:
Glover, Steven W; Addison, John; Gleghorn, Colette; Bramwell, John
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Health care libraries spend a large amount of their non-pay budgets on the purchase of scientific, technical and medical journals. In a typical hospital library in the National Health Service (NHS) North West Strategic Health Authority (SHA), this can represent between 80 and 90% of the collection development budget. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data were collected from 1 December 2005 to 30 November 2006 using COUNTER-generated usage statistics obtained from publishers' administration tools. Between the two trusts included in the study, 93 376 full-text article downloads were recorded; of these, 15 952 or 17.1% articles were downloaded from national core content journals via Proquest. Photocopies made by users for their own use were recorded whenever this data were available. CONCLUSIONS: NHS staff at the sites included in this study recorded a high volume of journal usage. There was a marked difference in usage patterns between the acute and specialist trusts in the study. The journals provided by national core content represented a much higher proportion of total usage at the acute trust (29.9%) compared with the specialist cancer trust (4.5%). This study supports the view that the local purchasing of journal titles is an important component of the overall journal-based information provision to NHS staff.
Affiliation:
Kostoris Library, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. sglover@picr.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Journal usage in NHS hospitals: a comparison report of total usage at an acute NHS Trust and a specialist NHS Trust in the North West of England. 2007, 24 (3):193-9 Health Info Libr J
Journal:
Health Information and Libraries Journal
Issue Date:
Sep-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70173
DOI:
10.1111/j.1471-1842.2007.00720.x
PubMed ID:
17714174
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1471-1834
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGlover, Steven W-
dc.contributor.authorAddison, John-
dc.contributor.authorGleghorn, Colette-
dc.contributor.authorBramwell, John-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-11T10:53:24Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-11T10:53:24Z-
dc.date.issued2007-09-
dc.identifier.citationJournal usage in NHS hospitals: a comparison report of total usage at an acute NHS Trust and a specialist NHS Trust in the North West of England. 2007, 24 (3):193-9 Health Info Libr Jen
dc.identifier.issn1471-1834-
dc.identifier.pmid17714174-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-1842.2007.00720.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/70173-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Health care libraries spend a large amount of their non-pay budgets on the purchase of scientific, technical and medical journals. In a typical hospital library in the National Health Service (NHS) North West Strategic Health Authority (SHA), this can represent between 80 and 90% of the collection development budget. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data were collected from 1 December 2005 to 30 November 2006 using COUNTER-generated usage statistics obtained from publishers' administration tools. Between the two trusts included in the study, 93 376 full-text article downloads were recorded; of these, 15 952 or 17.1% articles were downloaded from national core content journals via Proquest. Photocopies made by users for their own use were recorded whenever this data were available. CONCLUSIONS: NHS staff at the sites included in this study recorded a high volume of journal usage. There was a marked difference in usage patterns between the acute and specialist trusts in the study. The journals provided by national core content represented a much higher proportion of total usage at the acute trust (29.9%) compared with the specialist cancer trust (4.5%). This study supports the view that the local purchasing of journal titles is an important component of the overall journal-based information provision to NHS staff.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshEngland-
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Public-
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Special-
dc.subject.meshLibraries, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshState Medicine-
dc.titleJournal usage in NHS hospitals: a comparison report of total usage at an acute NHS Trust and a specialist NHS Trust in the North West of England.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKostoris Library, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. sglover@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalHealth Information and Libraries Journalen
All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.