Gap analysis of role definition and training needs for therapeutic research radiographers in the UK.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70034
Title:
Gap analysis of role definition and training needs for therapeutic research radiographers in the UK.
Authors:
Russell, Wanda; McNair, Helen A; Heaton, Angela; Ball, Kim; Routsis, Donna; Love, Kate; Miles, Elizabeth
Abstract:
In this study, we aimed to create a comprehensive register of UK research radiographers (RRs), identify perceived training needs and make recommendations for the forward planning of the RR community in 2007 and 2008. Radiotherapy departments in England were sent an Academic Clinical Oncology and Radiobiology Research Network (ACORRN) questionnaire on RR establishment, demographics, role descriptions, research responsibilities, funding, time allocations, research skills and barriers to research. ACORRN received 85 replies from 51 departments of which just 5 RRs had a 100% research role. 70 radiographers participated in research at some level. 13 departments did not have any RRs. The RR role was defined as both developmental and specialist in nature by 43% of respondents; the remainder had a more diverse role. The National Health Service Trusts were responsible for funding 40% of RRs; the rest were fully or part-funded by national or local cancer networks, charity appeals and industry. 61% of RRs did not have dedicated academic time despite 93% being required to teach or support others. Critical barriers reported in conducting research were time, funding and supporting others In conclusion, the ACORRN RR Working Party makes the following recommendations for the future development of the community: the role of research should be viewed as an integral feature, at least one RR should be employed per radiotherapy department, the RR community must work together, dedicated research time is required, along with stable funding, RRs require more training, RRs need more support to accomplish the diversity of roles.
Affiliation:
Academic Clinical Oncology and Radiobiology Research Network (ACORRN), Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK.
Citation:
Gap analysis of role definition and training needs for therapeutic research radiographers in the UK. 2007, 80 (957):693-701 Br J Radiol
Journal:
The British Journal of Radiology
Issue Date:
Sep-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/70034
DOI:
10.1259/bjr/32519670
PubMed ID:
17928497
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1748-880X
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Wanda-
dc.contributor.authorMcNair, Helen A-
dc.contributor.authorHeaton, Angela-
dc.contributor.authorBall, Kim-
dc.contributor.authorRoutsis, Donna-
dc.contributor.authorLove, Kate-
dc.contributor.authorMiles, Elizabeth-
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-09T16:21:53Z-
dc.date.available2009-06-09T16:21:53Z-
dc.date.issued2007-09-
dc.identifier.citationGap analysis of role definition and training needs for therapeutic research radiographers in the UK. 2007, 80 (957):693-701 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn1748-880X-
dc.identifier.pmid17928497-
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/bjr/32519670-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/70034-
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we aimed to create a comprehensive register of UK research radiographers (RRs), identify perceived training needs and make recommendations for the forward planning of the RR community in 2007 and 2008. Radiotherapy departments in England were sent an Academic Clinical Oncology and Radiobiology Research Network (ACORRN) questionnaire on RR establishment, demographics, role descriptions, research responsibilities, funding, time allocations, research skills and barriers to research. ACORRN received 85 replies from 51 departments of which just 5 RRs had a 100% research role. 70 radiographers participated in research at some level. 13 departments did not have any RRs. The RR role was defined as both developmental and specialist in nature by 43% of respondents; the remainder had a more diverse role. The National Health Service Trusts were responsible for funding 40% of RRs; the rest were fully or part-funded by national or local cancer networks, charity appeals and industry. 61% of RRs did not have dedicated academic time despite 93% being required to teach or support others. Critical barriers reported in conducting research were time, funding and supporting others In conclusion, the ACORRN RR Working Party makes the following recommendations for the future development of the community: the role of research should be viewed as an integral feature, at least one RR should be employed per radiotherapy department, the RR community must work together, dedicated research time is required, along with stable funding, RRs require more training, RRs need more support to accomplish the diversity of roles.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshData Collection-
dc.subject.meshEducation, Continuing-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshResearch-
dc.subject.meshResearch Personnel-
dc.subject.meshResearch Support as Topic-
dc.titleGap analysis of role definition and training needs for therapeutic research radiographers in the UK.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentAcademic Clinical Oncology and Radiobiology Research Network (ACORRN), Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe British Journal of Radiologyen
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