2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/68700
Title:
Oligosaccharides as anti-angiogenic agents.
Authors:
Cole, Claire L; Jayson, Gordon C ( 0000-0002-8515-8944 )
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Several studies of drugs that inhibit tumour angiogenesis have shown improvements in the survival of cancer patients, thus validating angiogenesis as a clinically relevant target. Both intracellular and extracellular approaches have shown promising results in clinical situations. OBJECTIVES: To compare and contrast oligosaccharide therapies and other anti-angiogenic compounds for their benefits and toxicity. Methods: Analysis of the relevant literature including presentations at recent conferences. RESULTS: Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors are orally available but have a broad spectrum of activity which is associated with toxicity. Antibodies are associated with different toxicities, however, they are administered parenterally. Oligosaccharides that act as competitive inhibitors of heparan sulfate (HS) are in the early and late phases of clinical development. The advantage of oligosaccharides should be that they can be designed to target several angiogenic molecules, that they are relatively safe and that they can be administered subcutaneously at home. The key questions concerning their development focus on whether compounds with sufficient affinity and relative specificity can be generated, whether they are active at doses that do not perturb the coagulation cascade to a clinically dangerous level, whether the synthetic routes are scalable and, whether the current Phase III trials will yield positive results. CONCLUSIONS: Saccharides represent a novel and exciting therapeutic approach that targets a spectrum of angiogenic molecules that cannot be inhibited through established drug development programmes.
Affiliation:
Translational Angiogenesis Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. ccole@picr.man.ac.uk
Citation:
Oligosaccharides as anti-angiogenic agents. 2008, 8 (3):351-62 Expert Opin Biol Ther
Journal:
Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Issue Date:
Mar-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/68700
DOI:
10.1517/14712598.8.3.351
PubMed ID:
18294105
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1744-7682
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research; Medical Oncology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCole, Claire L-
dc.contributor.authorJayson, Gordon C-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-21T16:46:54Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-21T16:46:54Z-
dc.date.issued2008-03-
dc.identifier.citationOligosaccharides as anti-angiogenic agents. 2008, 8 (3):351-62 Expert Opin Biol Theren
dc.identifier.issn1744-7682-
dc.identifier.pmid18294105-
dc.identifier.doi10.1517/14712598.8.3.351-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/68700-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Several studies of drugs that inhibit tumour angiogenesis have shown improvements in the survival of cancer patients, thus validating angiogenesis as a clinically relevant target. Both intracellular and extracellular approaches have shown promising results in clinical situations. OBJECTIVES: To compare and contrast oligosaccharide therapies and other anti-angiogenic compounds for their benefits and toxicity. Methods: Analysis of the relevant literature including presentations at recent conferences. RESULTS: Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors are orally available but have a broad spectrum of activity which is associated with toxicity. Antibodies are associated with different toxicities, however, they are administered parenterally. Oligosaccharides that act as competitive inhibitors of heparan sulfate (HS) are in the early and late phases of clinical development. The advantage of oligosaccharides should be that they can be designed to target several angiogenic molecules, that they are relatively safe and that they can be administered subcutaneously at home. The key questions concerning their development focus on whether compounds with sufficient affinity and relative specificity can be generated, whether they are active at doses that do not perturb the coagulation cascade to a clinically dangerous level, whether the synthetic routes are scalable and, whether the current Phase III trials will yield positive results. CONCLUSIONS: Saccharides represent a novel and exciting therapeutic approach that targets a spectrum of angiogenic molecules that cannot be inhibited through established drug development programmes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectBevacizumaben
dc.subjectFGF2en
dc.subjectFibroblast Growth Factor-2en
dc.subjectHeparan Sulfateen
dc.subject.meshAngiogenesis Inhibitors-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials as Topic-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Pathologic-
dc.subject.meshOligosaccharides-
dc.titleOligosaccharides as anti-angiogenic agents.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTranslational Angiogenesis Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. ccole@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalExpert Opinion on Biological Therapyen

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