Superiority of reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation over conventional treatment for relapse of Hodgkin's lymphoma following autologous stem cell transplantation.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/68068
Title:
Superiority of reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation over conventional treatment for relapse of Hodgkin's lymphoma following autologous stem cell transplantation.
Authors:
Thomson, Kirsty J; Peggs, Karl S; Smith, P; Cavet, James; Hunter, Ann; Parker, Anne; Pettengell, Ruth; Milligan, Donald W; Morris, Emma C; Goldstone, Anthony H; Linch, David C; Mackinnon, Stephen
Abstract:
This study compares outcome of reduced-intensity conditioned transplant (RIT) with outcome of conventional non-transplant therapy in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma relapsing following autograft. There were 72 patients in two groups who had relapsed, and received salvage therapy with chemotherapy+/-radiotherapy. One group (n=38) then underwent alemtuzumab-containing RIT. The second group-historical controls (n=34), relapsing before the advent of RIT-had no further high-dose therapy. This group was required to respond to salvage therapy and live for over 12 months post-relapse, demonstrating potential eligibility for RIT, had this been available. Overall survival (OS) from diagnosis was superior following RIT (48% at 10 years versus 15%; P=0.0014), as was survival from autograft (65% at 5 years versus 15%; P< or =0.0001). For the RIT group, OS at 5 years from allograft was 51%, and in chemoresponsive patients was 58%, with current progression-free survival of 42%. Responses were seen in 8 of 15 patients receiving donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) for relapse/progression, with durable remission in five patients at median follow-up from DLI of 45 months (28-55). These data demonstrate the potential efficacy of RIT in heavily pre-treated patients whose outlook with conventional therapy is dismal, and provide evidence of a clinically relevant graft-versus-lymphoma effect.
Affiliation:
Department of Haematology, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK. kirsty.thomson@uclh.nhs.uk
Citation:
Superiority of reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation over conventional treatment for relapse of Hodgkin's lymphoma following autologous stem cell transplantation. 2008, 41 (9):765-70 Bone Marrow Transplant.
Journal:
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Issue Date:
May-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/68068
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bmt.1705977
PubMed ID:
18195684
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0268-3369
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; Haematology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Kirsty J-
dc.contributor.authorPeggs, Karl S-
dc.contributor.authorSmith, P-
dc.contributor.authorCavet, James-
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Ann-
dc.contributor.authorParker, Anne-
dc.contributor.authorPettengell, Ruth-
dc.contributor.authorMilligan, Donald W-
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Emma C-
dc.contributor.authorGoldstone, Anthony H-
dc.contributor.authorLinch, David C-
dc.contributor.authorMackinnon, Stephen-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-13T16:21:02Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-13T16:21:02Z-
dc.date.issued2008-05-
dc.identifier.citationSuperiority of reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation over conventional treatment for relapse of Hodgkin's lymphoma following autologous stem cell transplantation. 2008, 41 (9):765-70 Bone Marrow Transplant.en
dc.identifier.issn0268-3369-
dc.identifier.pmid18195684-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bmt.1705977-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/68068-
dc.description.abstractThis study compares outcome of reduced-intensity conditioned transplant (RIT) with outcome of conventional non-transplant therapy in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma relapsing following autograft. There were 72 patients in two groups who had relapsed, and received salvage therapy with chemotherapy+/-radiotherapy. One group (n=38) then underwent alemtuzumab-containing RIT. The second group-historical controls (n=34), relapsing before the advent of RIT-had no further high-dose therapy. This group was required to respond to salvage therapy and live for over 12 months post-relapse, demonstrating potential eligibility for RIT, had this been available. Overall survival (OS) from diagnosis was superior following RIT (48% at 10 years versus 15%; P=0.0014), as was survival from autograft (65% at 5 years versus 15%; P< or =0.0001). For the RIT group, OS at 5 years from allograft was 51%, and in chemoresponsive patients was 58%, with current progression-free survival of 42%. Responses were seen in 8 of 15 patients receiving donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) for relapse/progression, with durable remission in five patients at median follow-up from DLI of 45 months (28-55). These data demonstrate the potential efficacy of RIT in heavily pre-treated patients whose outlook with conventional therapy is dismal, and provide evidence of a clinically relevant graft-versus-lymphoma effect.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHodgkin Lymphomaen
dc.subjectStem Cell Transplantationen
dc.titleSuperiority of reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation over conventional treatment for relapse of Hodgkin's lymphoma following autologous stem cell transplantation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Haematology, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London, UK. kirsty.thomson@uclh.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalBone Marrow Transplantationen

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