A ten-year experience of multiple flaps in head and neck surgery: how successful are they?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/67989
Title:
A ten-year experience of multiple flaps in head and neck surgery: how successful are they?
Authors:
Ross, Gary L; Ang, Erik S W; Lannon, Declan; Addison, Patrick; Golger, Alex; Novak, Christine B; Lipa, Joan E; Gullane, Patrick J; Neligan, Peter C
Abstract:
Ablative surgery in the head and neck often results in defects that require free flap reconstruction. With improved ablation/reconstructive and adjuvant techniques, improved survival has led to an increase in the number of patients undergoing multiple free flap reconstruction. We retrospectively analyzed a single institution's 10-year experience (August 1993 to August 2003) in free flap reconstruction for malignant tumors of the head and neck. Five hundred eighty-two flaps in 534 patients were identified with full details regarding ablation and reconstruction with a minimum of 6-month follow-up. Of these 584 flaps, 506 were for primary reconstruction, 50 for secondary reconstruction, 12 for tertiary reconstruction, and 8 patients underwent two flaps simultaneously for extensive defects. Overall flap success was 550/584 (94%). For primary free flap surgery, success was 481/506 (95%), compared with 44/50 (88%) for a second free flap reconstruction and 9/12 (75%) for a third free flap reconstruction ( P < 0.05). Eight extensive defects were reconstructed with 16 flaps, all of which were successful. More than one free flap may be required for reconstruction of head and neck defects, although success decreases as the number of reconstructive procedures increases.
Affiliation:
Division of Plastic Surgery, Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.
Citation:
A ten-year experience of multiple flaps in head and neck surgery: how successful are they? 2008, 24 (3):183-7 J Reconstr Microsurg
Journal:
Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery
Issue Date:
Apr-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/67989
DOI:
10.1055/s-2008-1076754
PubMed ID:
18459086
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0743-684X
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; Surgery

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Gary L-
dc.contributor.authorAng, Erik S W-
dc.contributor.authorLannon, Declan-
dc.contributor.authorAddison, Patrick-
dc.contributor.authorGolger, Alex-
dc.contributor.authorNovak, Christine B-
dc.contributor.authorLipa, Joan E-
dc.contributor.authorGullane, Patrick J-
dc.contributor.authorNeligan, Peter C-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-12T18:19:27Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-12T18:19:27Z-
dc.date.issued2008-04-
dc.identifier.citationA ten-year experience of multiple flaps in head and neck surgery: how successful are they? 2008, 24 (3):183-7 J Reconstr Microsurgen
dc.identifier.issn0743-684X-
dc.identifier.pmid18459086-
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-2008-1076754-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/67989-
dc.description.abstractAblative surgery in the head and neck often results in defects that require free flap reconstruction. With improved ablation/reconstructive and adjuvant techniques, improved survival has led to an increase in the number of patients undergoing multiple free flap reconstruction. We retrospectively analyzed a single institution's 10-year experience (August 1993 to August 2003) in free flap reconstruction for malignant tumors of the head and neck. Five hundred eighty-two flaps in 534 patients were identified with full details regarding ablation and reconstruction with a minimum of 6-month follow-up. Of these 584 flaps, 506 were for primary reconstruction, 50 for secondary reconstruction, 12 for tertiary reconstruction, and 8 patients underwent two flaps simultaneously for extensive defects. Overall flap success was 550/584 (94%). For primary free flap surgery, success was 481/506 (95%), compared with 44/50 (88%) for a second free flap reconstruction and 9/12 (75%) for a third free flap reconstruction ( P < 0.05). Eight extensive defects were reconstructed with 16 flaps, all of which were successful. More than one free flap may be required for reconstruction of head and neck defects, although success decreases as the number of reconstructive procedures increases.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHead and Neck Canceren
dc.subjectFree Flap Reconstructionen
dc.subjectMultiple Flapsen
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studies-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshGraft Survival-
dc.subject.meshHead and Neck Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSurgical Flaps-
dc.titleA ten-year experience of multiple flaps in head and neck surgery: how successful are they?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Plastic Surgery, Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Reconstructive Microsurgeryen

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