Cue-responding behaviours of oncology nurses in video-simulated interviews.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/67933
Title:
Cue-responding behaviours of oncology nurses in video-simulated interviews.
Authors:
Uitterhoeve, Ruud; De Leeuw, Jacqueline; Bensing, Jozien; Heaven, Cathy; Borm, George; Demulder, Pieter; Van Achterberg, Theo
Abstract:
AIM: This paper is a report of a study to describe nurse-patient interactions, i.e. nurses' cue-responding behaviour in encounters with actors playing the role of patients. BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer seldom express their concerns directly but express cues instead. Few studies empirically investigated nurses' cue-responding behaviour and the subsequent influence of disclosure of cues and concerns. METHODS: In this descriptive observational study, conducted from April to June 2004, five oncology nurses interviewed an actor playing the role of a patient with cancer. Each nurse performed seven different interviews (n = 35); these were videotaped and subsequently rated for cue-responding using the Medical Interview Aural Rating Scale. Mixed model analysis was used to investigate the relation between cues and cue-responding. FINDINGS: Half of the patients' cues were responded to with distancing behaviours. The other half of the cues were either explored (33%) or acknowledged (17%). In 16% of these responses, nurses used open directive questions. One out of four open directive questions were used as a distancing response, suggesting that open directive questions are not used to explore or acknowledge cues of patients. Cue-responding influenced subsequent expression of concerns and emotions, i.e. disclosure of a concern is two times higher after exploration or acknowledging of a preceding cue than after a distancing response. CONCLUSION: Cue-responding is a valuable concept which can contribute to our understanding of optimal ways of communicating. Cue-responding behaviour facilitates the disclosure of worries and concerns of patients. Further research is needed to assess the clinical relevancy of cue-responding.
Affiliation:
Centre for Quality of Care Research, Nursing Science, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. r.uitterhoeve@cis.umcn.nl
Citation:
Cue-responding behaviours of oncology nurses in video-simulated interviews. 2008, 61 (1):71-80 J Adv Nurs
Journal:
Journal of Advanced Nursing
Issue Date:
Jan-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/67933
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04467.x
PubMed ID:
18034816
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0309-2402
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUitterhoeve, Ruud-
dc.contributor.authorDe Leeuw, Jacqueline-
dc.contributor.authorBensing, Jozien-
dc.contributor.authorHeaven, Cathy-
dc.contributor.authorBorm, George-
dc.contributor.authorDemulder, Pieter-
dc.contributor.authorVan Achterberg, Theo-
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-12T14:23:03Z-
dc.date.available2009-05-12T14:23:03Z-
dc.date.issued2008-01-
dc.identifier.citationCue-responding behaviours of oncology nurses in video-simulated interviews. 2008, 61 (1):71-80 J Adv Nursen
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402-
dc.identifier.pmid18034816-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04467.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/67933-
dc.description.abstractAIM: This paper is a report of a study to describe nurse-patient interactions, i.e. nurses' cue-responding behaviour in encounters with actors playing the role of patients. BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer seldom express their concerns directly but express cues instead. Few studies empirically investigated nurses' cue-responding behaviour and the subsequent influence of disclosure of cues and concerns. METHODS: In this descriptive observational study, conducted from April to June 2004, five oncology nurses interviewed an actor playing the role of a patient with cancer. Each nurse performed seven different interviews (n = 35); these were videotaped and subsequently rated for cue-responding using the Medical Interview Aural Rating Scale. Mixed model analysis was used to investigate the relation between cues and cue-responding. FINDINGS: Half of the patients' cues were responded to with distancing behaviours. The other half of the cues were either explored (33%) or acknowledged (17%). In 16% of these responses, nurses used open directive questions. One out of four open directive questions were used as a distancing response, suggesting that open directive questions are not used to explore or acknowledge cues of patients. Cue-responding influenced subsequent expression of concerns and emotions, i.e. disclosure of a concern is two times higher after exploration or acknowledging of a preceding cue than after a distancing response. CONCLUSION: Cue-responding is a valuable concept which can contribute to our understanding of optimal ways of communicating. Cue-responding behaviour facilitates the disclosure of worries and concerns of patients. Further research is needed to assess the clinical relevancy of cue-responding.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Nursingen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBehavior-
dc.subject.meshCues-
dc.subject.meshDisclosure-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topic-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNetherlands-
dc.subject.meshNurse-Patient Relations-
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshOncologic Nursing-
dc.subject.meshPatient Simulation-
dc.titleCue-responding behaviours of oncology nurses in video-simulated interviews.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Quality of Care Research, Nursing Science, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. r.uitterhoeve@cis.umcn.nlen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Advanced Nursingen

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