2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/620553
Title:
Primitive erythrocytes are generated from hemogenic endothelial cells
Authors:
Stefanska, Monika; Batta, Kiran; Patel, Rahima; Florkowska, Magdalena; Kouskoff, Valerie; Lacaud, Georges
Abstract:
Primitive erythroblasts are the first blood cells generated during embryonic hematopoiesis. Tracking their emergence both in vivo and in vitro has remained challenging due to the lack of specific cell surface markers. To selectively investigate primitive erythropoiesis, we have engineered a new transgenic embryonic stem (ES) cell line, where eGFP expression is driven by the regulatory sequences of the embryonic βH1 hemoglobin gene expressed specifically in primitive erythroid cells. Using this ES cell line, we observed that the first primitive erythroblasts are detected in vitro around day 1.5 of blast colony differentiation, within the cell population positive for the early hematopoietic progenitor marker CD41. Moreover, we establish that these eGFP(+) cells emerge from a hemogenic endothelial cell population similarly to their definitive hematopoietic counterparts. We further generated a corresponding βH1-eGFP transgenic mouse model and demonstrated the presence of a primitive erythroid primed hemogenic endothelial cell population in the developing embryo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that both in vivo and in vitro primitive erythrocytes are generated from hemogenic endothelial cells.
Affiliation:
Cancer Research UK Stem Cell Biology Group, Cancer Research UK
Citation:
Primitive erythrocytes are generated from hemogenic endothelial cells. 2017, 7 (1):6401 Sci Rep
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
25-Jul-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/620553
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-06627-9
PubMed ID:
28743905
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
ISSN:
2045-2322
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStefanska, Monikaen
dc.contributor.authorBatta, Kiranen
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Rahimaen
dc.contributor.authorFlorkowska, Magdalenaen
dc.contributor.authorKouskoff, Valerieen
dc.contributor.authorLacaud, Georgesen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-08T14:58:56Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-08T14:58:56Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25-
dc.identifier.citationPrimitive erythrocytes are generated from hemogenic endothelial cells. 2017, 7 (1):6401 Sci Repen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.pmid28743905-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-06627-9-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620553-
dc.description.abstractPrimitive erythroblasts are the first blood cells generated during embryonic hematopoiesis. Tracking their emergence both in vivo and in vitro has remained challenging due to the lack of specific cell surface markers. To selectively investigate primitive erythropoiesis, we have engineered a new transgenic embryonic stem (ES) cell line, where eGFP expression is driven by the regulatory sequences of the embryonic βH1 hemoglobin gene expressed specifically in primitive erythroid cells. Using this ES cell line, we observed that the first primitive erythroblasts are detected in vitro around day 1.5 of blast colony differentiation, within the cell population positive for the early hematopoietic progenitor marker CD41. Moreover, we establish that these eGFP(+) cells emerge from a hemogenic endothelial cell population similarly to their definitive hematopoietic counterparts. We further generated a corresponding βH1-eGFP transgenic mouse model and demonstrated the presence of a primitive erythroid primed hemogenic endothelial cell population in the developing embryo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that both in vivo and in vitro primitive erythrocytes are generated from hemogenic endothelial cells.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Scientific reportsen
dc.titlePrimitive erythrocytes are generated from hemogenic endothelial cellsen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK Stem Cell Biology Group, Cancer Research UKen
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen

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