Cancer-related fatigue in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: Persistent and poorly managed.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/620491
Title:
Cancer-related fatigue in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: Persistent and poorly managed.
Authors:
Spathis, A; Hatcher, H; Booth, S; Gibson, F; Stone, P; Abbas, L; Barclay, M; Brimicombe, J; Thiemann, P; McCabe, Martin; Campsey, Rachel; Hooker, L; Moss, W; Robson, J; Barclay, S
Abstract:
Cancer-related fatigue is the most prevalent and distressing symptom experienced by adolescents and young adults (AYAs). An electronic survey was undertaken to ascertain current fatigue management and perceptions of its effectiveness. Eighty-five percent of responders (68/80) experienced fatigue, and it was worse more than 1 year after cancer treatment ended, compared to <1 year (p = 0.007). Forty-one percent received no fatigue management. Although advice to exercise was the most frequent intervention, the greatest impact of fatigue was on the ability to exercise and most did not find exercise advice helpful. Early intervention is warranted, supporting AYAs to persevere with increasing activity.
Affiliation:
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust , Cambridge, United Kingdom
Citation:
Cancer-related fatigue in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: Persistent and poorly managed. 2017 J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol
Journal:
Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology
Issue Date:
17-Jul-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/620491
DOI:
10.1089/jayao.2017.0037
PubMed ID:
28714766
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2156-535X
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSpathis, Aen
dc.contributor.authorHatcher, Hen
dc.contributor.authorBooth, Sen
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Fen
dc.contributor.authorStone, Pen
dc.contributor.authorAbbas, Len
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Men
dc.contributor.authorBrimicombe, Jen
dc.contributor.authorThiemann, Pen
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorCampsey, Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorHooker, Len
dc.contributor.authorMoss, Wen
dc.contributor.authorRobson, Jen
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Sen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T13:42:53Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-08T13:42:53Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-17-
dc.identifier.citationCancer-related fatigue in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: Persistent and poorly managed. 2017 J Adolesc Young Adult Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn2156-535X-
dc.identifier.pmid28714766-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/jayao.2017.0037-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620491-
dc.description.abstractCancer-related fatigue is the most prevalent and distressing symptom experienced by adolescents and young adults (AYAs). An electronic survey was undertaken to ascertain current fatigue management and perceptions of its effectiveness. Eighty-five percent of responders (68/80) experienced fatigue, and it was worse more than 1 year after cancer treatment ended, compared to <1 year (p = 0.007). Forty-one percent received no fatigue management. Although advice to exercise was the most frequent intervention, the greatest impact of fatigue was on the ability to exercise and most did not find exercise advice helpful. Early intervention is warranted, supporting AYAs to persevere with increasing activity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of adolescent and young adult oncologyen
dc.titleCancer-related fatigue in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: Persistent and poorly managed.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust , Cambridge, United Kingdomen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncologyen

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