2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/620191
Title:
Obesity as an avoidable cause of cancer (attributable risks).
Authors:
Renehan, Andrew G; Soerjomataram, I
Abstract:
Excess body weight, commonly categorised as overweight (body mass index, BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) is an established risk factor for increased incidence of several adult cancers. As body weight is modifiable, there is a potential for cancer prevention. Calculation of attributable risk (here expressed at population attributable fraction, PAF) offers an estimate of the burden of excess cancers attributable to elevated BMI in populations, and thus an approximation of avoidable cases and the opportunity for prevention. Using counterfactual methods, the estimated PAF worldwide attributed to elevated BMI is 3.6 % or nearly half a million new cancer cases in adults (aged 30 years and older after a 10-year lag period). PAFs are higher in women compared with men (5.4 % vs. 1.9 %). Endometrial, post-menopausal breast, and colon cancers account for nearly two-thirds of cancers attributable to elevated BMI. Globally, excess body weight is the third commonest attributable risk factor for cancer (after smoking and infection); in western populations such as the UK, excess weight ranks as second commonest risk factor.
Affiliation:
Division of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK
Citation:
Obesity as an avoidable cause of cancer (attributable risks). 2016, 208:243-256 Recent Results Cancer Res
Journal:
Recent Results in Cancer Research
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/620191
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-42542-9_13
PubMed ID:
27909911
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0080-0015
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRenehan, Andrew Gen
dc.contributor.authorSoerjomataram, Ien
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-13T10:29:58Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-13T10:29:58Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationObesity as an avoidable cause of cancer (attributable risks). 2016, 208:243-256 Recent Results Cancer Resen
dc.identifier.issn0080-0015-
dc.identifier.pmid27909911-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-42542-9_13-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620191-
dc.description.abstractExcess body weight, commonly categorised as overweight (body mass index, BMI 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2)) is an established risk factor for increased incidence of several adult cancers. As body weight is modifiable, there is a potential for cancer prevention. Calculation of attributable risk (here expressed at population attributable fraction, PAF) offers an estimate of the burden of excess cancers attributable to elevated BMI in populations, and thus an approximation of avoidable cases and the opportunity for prevention. Using counterfactual methods, the estimated PAF worldwide attributed to elevated BMI is 3.6 % or nearly half a million new cancer cases in adults (aged 30 years and older after a 10-year lag period). PAFs are higher in women compared with men (5.4 % vs. 1.9 %). Endometrial, post-menopausal breast, and colon cancers account for nearly two-thirds of cancers attributable to elevated BMI. Globally, excess body weight is the third commonest attributable risk factor for cancer (after smoking and infection); in western populations such as the UK, excess weight ranks as second commonest risk factor.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Recent results in cancer research. Fortschritte der Krebsforschung. Progres dans les recherches sur le canceren
dc.titleObesity as an avoidable cause of cancer (attributable risks).en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UKen
dc.identifier.journalRecent Results in Cancer Researchen

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