Systemic treatment for advanced (stage IIIb/IV) non-small cell lung cancer: more treatment options; more things to consider. Introduction.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/59113
Title:
Systemic treatment for advanced (stage IIIb/IV) non-small cell lung cancer: more treatment options; more things to consider. Introduction.
Authors:
Bunn, Paul A; Thatcher, Nick
Abstract:
Lung cancer is the most common cancer and a highly lethal disease, with improvements in survival rates being dependent on advances in early detection and improved systemic therapies applied to surgery and/or irradiation in early-stage disease. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents around 80% of all lung cancers, and unfortunately at diagnosis most patients have advanced unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. Indeed, 30%-40% of patients treated with first-line therapy will subsequently be candidates for second-line treatment. Current U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved second-line treatments are docetaxel (a taxane), pemetrexed (a folate antimetabolite), and erlotinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] tyrosine kinase inhibitor [TKI]). Gefitinib, another EGFR TKI, currently has only limited use in North America and is not available in Europe. These and other new molecular-target-specific agents may have the potential to maximize therapeutic benefit while minimizing toxicity to normal cells. Overexpression of EGFR is reported to occur in 40%-80% of NSCLC cases, and EGFR mutations are associated with a significantly higher response rate and longer duration of response following treatment with EGFR TKIs. Another option is antiangiogenesis: the growth and persistence of solid tumors and their metastases are angiogenesis dependent, and so antiangiogenic therapies have been developed, such as the use of TKIs that block the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In fact, many commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs have antiangiogenic activity. Ongoing studies are focusing on patient selection and targeted therapies, and there are many new agents undergoing clinical trials.
Affiliation:
University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
Citation:
Systemic treatment for advanced (stage IIIb/IV) non-small cell lung cancer: more treatment options; more things to consider. Introduction. 2008, 13 Suppl 1:1-4 Oncologist
Journal:
The Oncologist
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/59113
DOI:
10.1634/theoncologist.13-S1-1
PubMed ID:
18263768
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1083-7159
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; Medical Oncology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBunn, Paul A-
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nick-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-02T15:55:50Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-02T15:55:50Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationSystemic treatment for advanced (stage IIIb/IV) non-small cell lung cancer: more treatment options; more things to consider. Introduction. 2008, 13 Suppl 1:1-4 Oncologisten
dc.identifier.issn1083-7159-
dc.identifier.pmid18263768-
dc.identifier.doi10.1634/theoncologist.13-S1-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/59113-
dc.description.abstractLung cancer is the most common cancer and a highly lethal disease, with improvements in survival rates being dependent on advances in early detection and improved systemic therapies applied to surgery and/or irradiation in early-stage disease. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents around 80% of all lung cancers, and unfortunately at diagnosis most patients have advanced unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. Indeed, 30%-40% of patients treated with first-line therapy will subsequently be candidates for second-line treatment. Current U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved second-line treatments are docetaxel (a taxane), pemetrexed (a folate antimetabolite), and erlotinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] tyrosine kinase inhibitor [TKI]). Gefitinib, another EGFR TKI, currently has only limited use in North America and is not available in Europe. These and other new molecular-target-specific agents may have the potential to maximize therapeutic benefit while minimizing toxicity to normal cells. Overexpression of EGFR is reported to occur in 40%-80% of NSCLC cases, and EGFR mutations are associated with a significantly higher response rate and longer duration of response following treatment with EGFR TKIs. Another option is antiangiogenesis: the growth and persistence of solid tumors and their metastases are angiogenesis dependent, and so antiangiogenic therapies have been developed, such as the use of TKIs that block the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In fact, many commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs have antiangiogenic activity. Ongoing studies are focusing on patient selection and targeted therapies, and there are many new agents undergoing clinical trials.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAngiogenesis Inhibitorsen
dc.subjectAntimetabolitesen
dc.subjectNon-Small-Cell Lung Canceren
dc.subjectCancer Stagingen
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung-
dc.subject.meshGene Expression-
dc.subject.meshGenes, erbB-1-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging-
dc.subject.meshProtein Kinase Inhibitors-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleSystemic treatment for advanced (stage IIIb/IV) non-small cell lung cancer: more treatment options; more things to consider. Introduction.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Oncologisten
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