Lymphocyte telomere length correlates with in vitro radiosensitivity in breast cancer cases but is not predictive of acute normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/58718
Title:
Lymphocyte telomere length correlates with in vitro radiosensitivity in breast cancer cases but is not predictive of acute normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy.
Authors:
Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Robertson, Naomi; Tsigani, Theodora; Finnon, Paul; Scott, David A; Levine, Edward; Badie, Christophe; Bouffler, Simon
Abstract:
PURPOSE: To examine the hypothesis that lymphocyte telomere length may be predictive of both breast cancer susceptibility and severity of acute reactions to radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from breast cancer patients (with normal or severe skin reactions to radiotherapy) and normal individuals were assessed for in vitro radiosensitivity as measured by apoptosis, cell cycle delay and cytotoxicity. Telomere lengths were determined by a flow cytometric fluorescence in situ hybridization assay (FLOW-FISH). RESULTS: Female breast cancer cases (n = 24) had reduced lymphocyte telomere lengths by comparison with healthy controls (n = 20, p < 0.04). However, the average age of healthy controls was less (45.4) than cases (53). When the control group was modified to give a better age match (51.5, n = 13) the reduced telomere length in cases was not significantly different from controls. Lymphocytes from breast cancer cases also showed reduced cell cycle delay (p < 0.001) and increased apoptosis (p < 0.01) following irradiation in vitro at 3 and 5 Gy respectively, compared to healthy controls. Statistical significance was maintained with the improved age matching of groups. Comparison of lymphocytes from breast cancer patients with normal (n = 11) and severe (n = 13) skin reactions to radiotherapy failed to identify differences in telomere length or cellular radiosensitivity in this limited sample. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to the evidence suggesting a correlation between altered cellular radiosensitivity and breast cancer. However, in the cases investigated, telomere length does not appear to be predictive of acute skin reactions to radiotherapy.
Affiliation:
Radiation Effects Department, Health Protection Agency, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, UK.
Citation:
Lymphocyte telomere length correlates with in vitro radiosensitivity in breast cancer cases but is not predictive of acute normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy. 2008, 84 (4):277-84 Int. J. Radiat. Biol.
Journal:
International Journal of Radiation Biology
Issue Date:
Apr-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/58718
DOI:
10.1080/09553000801953326
PubMed ID:
18386193
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0955-3002
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research; Clinical Oncology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIwasaki, Toshiyasu-
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Naomi-
dc.contributor.authorTsigani, Theodora-
dc.contributor.authorFinnon, Paul-
dc.contributor.authorScott, David A-
dc.contributor.authorLevine, Edward-
dc.contributor.authorBadie, Christophe-
dc.contributor.authorBouffler, Simon-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T23:21:34Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T23:21:34Z-
dc.date.issued2008-04-
dc.identifier.citationLymphocyte telomere length correlates with in vitro radiosensitivity in breast cancer cases but is not predictive of acute normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy. 2008, 84 (4):277-84 Int. J. Radiat. Biol.en
dc.identifier.issn0955-3002-
dc.identifier.pmid18386193-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09553000801953326-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/58718-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To examine the hypothesis that lymphocyte telomere length may be predictive of both breast cancer susceptibility and severity of acute reactions to radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from breast cancer patients (with normal or severe skin reactions to radiotherapy) and normal individuals were assessed for in vitro radiosensitivity as measured by apoptosis, cell cycle delay and cytotoxicity. Telomere lengths were determined by a flow cytometric fluorescence in situ hybridization assay (FLOW-FISH). RESULTS: Female breast cancer cases (n = 24) had reduced lymphocyte telomere lengths by comparison with healthy controls (n = 20, p < 0.04). However, the average age of healthy controls was less (45.4) than cases (53). When the control group was modified to give a better age match (51.5, n = 13) the reduced telomere length in cases was not significantly different from controls. Lymphocytes from breast cancer cases also showed reduced cell cycle delay (p < 0.001) and increased apoptosis (p < 0.01) following irradiation in vitro at 3 and 5 Gy respectively, compared to healthy controls. Statistical significance was maintained with the improved age matching of groups. Comparison of lymphocytes from breast cancer patients with normal (n = 11) and severe (n = 13) skin reactions to radiotherapy failed to identify differences in telomere length or cellular radiosensitivity in this limited sample. CONCLUSIONS: This study adds to the evidence suggesting a correlation between altered cellular radiosensitivity and breast cancer. However, in the cases investigated, telomere length does not appear to be predictive of acute skin reactions to radiotherapy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectRadiation Sensitivityen
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.subjectRadiotherapy Reactionen
dc.subjectTumour Cells-
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLymphocytes-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosage-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Tolerance-
dc.subject.meshTelomere-
dc.subject.meshTumor Cells, Cultured-
dc.titleLymphocyte telomere length correlates with in vitro radiosensitivity in breast cancer cases but is not predictive of acute normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRadiation Effects Department, Health Protection Agency, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Radiation Biologyen

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