2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/55800
Title:
Access to care.
Authors:
Albritton, Karen H; Eden, Tim O B
Abstract:
Rapid diagnosis, timely initiation of optimal treatment and good supportive care should be the gold standard for all patients who develop cancer, irrespective of age and where they live. This article reviews the evidence that teenagers/adolescents and young adults may be disadvantaged with regard to access to care. Delays in diagnosis and the reasons for them (patient and professional), low enrolment into clinical trials, suboptimal treatment strategies and place of care are addressed. We must access the voice of the young, address their needs, and involve them more in decisions concerning their own health. Progress is being made slowly in several countries and international collaboration linking patients, health care professionals, governmental and non-governmental agencies is essential. Such international collaboration and focus, with specific research goals are suggested in order to make variation in access to optimal care become a thing of the past.
Affiliation:
Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. karen_albritton@dfci.harvard.edu
Citation:
Access to care. 2008, 50 (5 Suppl):1094-8 Pediatr Blood Cancer
Journal:
Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Issue Date:
May-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/55800
DOI:
10.1002/pbc.21461
PubMed ID:
18360836
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1545-5017
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAlbritton, Karen H-
dc.contributor.authorEden, Tim O B-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-16T17:14:06Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-16T17:14:06Z-
dc.date.issued2008-05-
dc.identifier.citationAccess to care. 2008, 50 (5 Suppl):1094-8 Pediatr Blood Canceren
dc.identifier.issn1545-5017-
dc.identifier.pmid18360836-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pbc.21461-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/55800-
dc.description.abstractRapid diagnosis, timely initiation of optimal treatment and good supportive care should be the gold standard for all patients who develop cancer, irrespective of age and where they live. This article reviews the evidence that teenagers/adolescents and young adults may be disadvantaged with regard to access to care. Delays in diagnosis and the reasons for them (patient and professional), low enrolment into clinical trials, suboptimal treatment strategies and place of care are addressed. We must access the voice of the young, address their needs, and involve them more in decisions concerning their own health. Progress is being made slowly in several countries and international collaboration linking patients, health care professionals, governmental and non-governmental agencies is essential. Such international collaboration and focus, with specific research goals are suggested in order to make variation in access to optimal care become a thing of the past.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAccessen
dc.subjectCancer Careen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Health Services-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshClinical Trials as Topic-
dc.subject.meshDisease Management-
dc.subject.meshEarly Diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGoals-
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Accessibility-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInternational Cooperation-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPatient Selection-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleAccess to care.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. karen_albritton@dfci.harvard.eduen
dc.identifier.journalPediatric Blood & Canceren
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