A phase II study evaluating the use of concurrent mitomycin C and capecitabine in patients with advanced unresectable pseudomyxoma peritonei.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/55796
Title:
A phase II study evaluating the use of concurrent mitomycin C and capecitabine in patients with advanced unresectable pseudomyxoma peritonei.
Authors:
Farquharson, Adam L; Pranesh, Nagarajan; Witham, Gary; Swindell, Ric; Taylor, Malcolm B; Renehan, Andrew G; Rout, Shantanu; Wilson, Malcolm S; O'Dwyer, Sarah T; Saunders, Mark P
Abstract:
Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare neoplastic process characterised by progressive intra-abdominal dissemination of mucinous tumour, and generally considered resistant to systemic chemotherapy. A phase II study in patients with advanced unresectable PMP was undertaken to evaluate the combination of systemic concurrent mitomycin C (7 mg m(-2) i.v. on day 1) and capecitabine (1250 mg m(-2) b.d. on days 1-14) in a 3-weekly cycle (MCap). Response was determined by semiquantitative assessment of disease volume on serial computed tomographic (CT) scans and serum tumour marker (CEA, CA125, CA19-9) changes at 12 weeks. Between 2003 and 2006, 40 patients were recruited through a national centre for the treatment of peritoneal surface tumours. At baseline, 23 patients had progressive disease and 17 had stable disease. Of 39 assessable patients, 15 (38%, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 25, 54%) benefited from chemotherapy in the form of either reductions in mucinous deposition or stabilisation of progressive pretreatment disease determined on CT scan. Notably, two patients, originally considered unresectable, following MCap and re-staging underwent potentially curative cytoreductive surgery. Grade 3/4 toxicity rates were low (6%, 95% CIs: 4, 9%). Twenty out of 29 assessed patients (69%, 95% CIs: 51, 83%) felt that their Global Health Status improved during chemotherapy. This is the first trial to demonstrate an apparent benefit of systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced unresectable PMP.
Affiliation:
Peritoneal Tumour Service, Department of Surgery, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
A phase II study evaluating the use of concurrent mitomycin C and capecitabine in patients with advanced unresectable pseudomyxoma peritonei. 2008, 99 (4):591-6 Br. J. Cancer
Journal:
British Journal of Cancer
Issue Date:
19-Aug-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/55796
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6604522
PubMed ID:
18682713
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1532-1827
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications ; Radiology; Clinical Oncology; Surgery

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFarquharson, Adam L-
dc.contributor.authorPranesh, Nagarajan-
dc.contributor.authorWitham, Gary-
dc.contributor.authorSwindell, Ric-
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Malcolm B-
dc.contributor.authorRenehan, Andrew G-
dc.contributor.authorRout, Shantanu-
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Malcolm S-
dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, Sarah T-
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Mark P-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-16T16:35:25Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-16T16:35:25Z-
dc.date.issued2008-08-19-
dc.identifier.citationA phase II study evaluating the use of concurrent mitomycin C and capecitabine in patients with advanced unresectable pseudomyxoma peritonei. 2008, 99 (4):591-6 Br. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn1532-1827-
dc.identifier.pmid18682713-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bjc.6604522-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/55796-
dc.description.abstractPseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare neoplastic process characterised by progressive intra-abdominal dissemination of mucinous tumour, and generally considered resistant to systemic chemotherapy. A phase II study in patients with advanced unresectable PMP was undertaken to evaluate the combination of systemic concurrent mitomycin C (7 mg m(-2) i.v. on day 1) and capecitabine (1250 mg m(-2) b.d. on days 1-14) in a 3-weekly cycle (MCap). Response was determined by semiquantitative assessment of disease volume on serial computed tomographic (CT) scans and serum tumour marker (CEA, CA125, CA19-9) changes at 12 weeks. Between 2003 and 2006, 40 patients were recruited through a national centre for the treatment of peritoneal surface tumours. At baseline, 23 patients had progressive disease and 17 had stable disease. Of 39 assessable patients, 15 (38%, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 25, 54%) benefited from chemotherapy in the form of either reductions in mucinous deposition or stabilisation of progressive pretreatment disease determined on CT scan. Notably, two patients, originally considered unresectable, following MCap and re-staging underwent potentially curative cytoreductive surgery. Grade 3/4 toxicity rates were low (6%, 95% CIs: 4, 9%). Twenty out of 29 assessed patients (69%, 95% CIs: 51, 83%) felt that their Global Health Status improved during chemotherapy. This is the first trial to demonstrate an apparent benefit of systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced unresectable PMP.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPsedomyxoma Peritoneien
dc.subjectChemotherapyen
dc.subjectCapecitabineen
dc.subjectMitomycin Cen
dc.subjectPMPen
dc.subjectPeritoneal Cancer-
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma, Mucinous-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols-
dc.subject.meshCA-125 Antigen-
dc.subject.meshCA-19-9 Antigen-
dc.subject.meshCarcinoembryonic Antigen-
dc.subject.meshDeoxycytidine-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFluorouracil-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshMitomycin-
dc.subject.meshPeritoneal Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPseudomyxoma Peritonei-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleA phase II study evaluating the use of concurrent mitomycin C and capecitabine in patients with advanced unresectable pseudomyxoma peritonei.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPeritoneal Tumour Service, Department of Surgery, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren
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