2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/55033
Title:
Molecular-targeted therapies: lessons from years of clinical development.
Authors:
Rosa, Daniela D; Ismael, Gustavo F V; Lago, Lissandra Dal; Awada, Ahmad
Abstract:
Over the past decade, molecular-targeted therapies have been added to cytotoxic and anti-endocrine drugs in the treatment of cancer, with the aim to target the molecular pathways that underlie the carcinogenic process and maintain the cancer phenotype. Success with some of these agents has suggested that identification and validation of the drug target is the starting point for the route of development of active, safe and effective drugs. Main molecular targets used to the development of anticancer drugs are cell surface receptors, signal transduction pathways, gene transcription targets, ubiquitin-proteasome/heat shock proteins and tumour microenvironment components (especially antiangiogenic agents). Here, we review the development of the main molecular targeted non-cytotoxic agents studied in cancer, highlighting lessons derived from the development of these novel drugs and proposing new horizons for the clinical development of molecular-targeted therapies.
Affiliation:
Medical Oncology Clinic, Jules Bordet Institute, and L Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium. dornellesrosa@hotmail.com
Citation:
Molecular-targeted therapies: lessons from years of clinical development. 2008, 34 (1):61-80 Cancer Treat. Rev.
Journal:
Cancer Treatment Reviews
Issue Date:
Feb-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/55033
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctrv.2007.07.019
PubMed ID:
17826917
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0305-7372
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRosa, Daniela D-
dc.contributor.authorIsmael, Gustavo F V-
dc.contributor.authorLago, Lissandra Dal-
dc.contributor.authorAwada, Ahmad-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-12T17:03:55Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-12T17:03:55Z-
dc.date.issued2008-02-
dc.identifier.citationMolecular-targeted therapies: lessons from years of clinical development. 2008, 34 (1):61-80 Cancer Treat. Rev.en
dc.identifier.issn0305-7372-
dc.identifier.pmid17826917-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ctrv.2007.07.019-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/55033-
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade, molecular-targeted therapies have been added to cytotoxic and anti-endocrine drugs in the treatment of cancer, with the aim to target the molecular pathways that underlie the carcinogenic process and maintain the cancer phenotype. Success with some of these agents has suggested that identification and validation of the drug target is the starting point for the route of development of active, safe and effective drugs. Main molecular targets used to the development of anticancer drugs are cell surface receptors, signal transduction pathways, gene transcription targets, ubiquitin-proteasome/heat shock proteins and tumour microenvironment components (especially antiangiogenic agents). Here, we review the development of the main molecular targeted non-cytotoxic agents studied in cancer, highlighting lessons derived from the development of these novel drugs and proposing new horizons for the clinical development of molecular-targeted therapies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectMolecular-Targeted Therapiesen
dc.subjectDrug Developmenten
dc.subjectAnticancer Drugsen
dc.subjectCancer Stem Cells-
dc.subject.meshAngiogenesis Inhibitors-
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents-
dc.subject.meshDrug Delivery Systems-
dc.subject.meshDrug Design-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNeoplastic Stem Cells-
dc.subject.meshSignal Transduction-
dc.titleMolecular-targeted therapies: lessons from years of clinical development.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMedical Oncology Clinic, Jules Bordet Institute, and L Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium. dornellesrosa@hotmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalCancer Treatment Reviewsen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.