2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/53113
Title:
Comparison of normal tissue R1 and R*2 modulation by oxygen and carbogen.
Authors:
O'Connor, James P B; Naish, Josephine H; Jackson, Alan; Waterton, John C; Watson, Yvonne; Cheung, Susan; Buckley, David L; McGrath, Deirdre M; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A; Mills, Samantha J; Roberts, Caleb; Jayson, Gordon C ( 0000-0002-8515-8944 ) ; Parker, Geoff J M
Abstract:
Magnetic resonance imaging has shown promise for evaluating tissue oxygenation. In this study differences in the tissue longitudinal relaxation rate (R(1)) and effective transverse relaxation rate (R(*)(2)), induced by inhalation of pure oxygen and carbogen, were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects. Significant reductions in R(1) were demonstrated following both oxygen and carbogen inhalation in the spleen (both P < 0.001), liver (P = 0.002 air vs. oxygen; P = 0.001 air vs. carbogen), skeletal muscle (both P < 0.001), and renal cortex (P = 0.005 air vs. oxygen; P = 0.008 air vs. carbogen). No significant change in R(*)(2) occurred following pure oxygen in any organ. However, a significant increase in R(*)(2) was observed in the spleen (P < 0.001), liver (P = 0.001), skeletal muscle (P = 0.026), and renal cortex (P = 0.001) following carbogen inhalation, an opposite effect to that observed in many studies of tumor pathophysiology. Changes in R(1) and R(*)(2) were independent of the gas administration order in the spleen and skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that the R(1) and R(*)(2) responses to hyperoxic gases are independent biomarkers of oxygen physiology.
Affiliation:
Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Comparison of normal tissue R1 and R*2 modulation by oxygen and carbogen. 2009, 61 (1):75-83notMagn Reson Med
Journal:
Magnetic Resonance in Medicine : official journal of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine
Issue Date:
Jan-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/53113
DOI:
10.1002/mrm.21815
PubMed ID:
19097212
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1522-2594
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research; Medical Oncology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, James P B-
dc.contributor.authorNaish, Josephine H-
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Alan-
dc.contributor.authorWaterton, John C-
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Yvonne-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Susan-
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, David L-
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, Deirdre M-
dc.contributor.authorBuonaccorsi, Giovanni A-
dc.contributor.authorMills, Samantha J-
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Caleb-
dc.contributor.authorJayson, Gordon C-
dc.contributor.authorParker, Geoff J M-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-09T12:35:09Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-09T12:35:09Z-
dc.date.issued2009-01-
dc.identifier.citationComparison of normal tissue R1 and R*2 modulation by oxygen and carbogen. 2009, 61 (1):75-83notMagn Reson Meden
dc.identifier.issn1522-2594-
dc.identifier.pmid19097212-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/mrm.21815-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/53113-
dc.description.abstractMagnetic resonance imaging has shown promise for evaluating tissue oxygenation. In this study differences in the tissue longitudinal relaxation rate (R(1)) and effective transverse relaxation rate (R(*)(2)), induced by inhalation of pure oxygen and carbogen, were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects. Significant reductions in R(1) were demonstrated following both oxygen and carbogen inhalation in the spleen (both P < 0.001), liver (P = 0.002 air vs. oxygen; P = 0.001 air vs. carbogen), skeletal muscle (both P < 0.001), and renal cortex (P = 0.005 air vs. oxygen; P = 0.008 air vs. carbogen). No significant change in R(*)(2) occurred following pure oxygen in any organ. However, a significant increase in R(*)(2) was observed in the spleen (P < 0.001), liver (P = 0.001), skeletal muscle (P = 0.026), and renal cortex (P = 0.001) following carbogen inhalation, an opposite effect to that observed in many studies of tumor pathophysiology. Changes in R(1) and R(*)(2) were independent of the gas administration order in the spleen and skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that the R(1) and R(*)(2) responses to hyperoxic gases are independent biomarkers of oxygen physiology.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBiomarkersen
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Inhalation-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAlgorithms-
dc.subject.meshCarbon Dioxide-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImage Enhancement-
dc.subject.meshImage Interpretation, Computer-Assisted-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMetabolic Clearance Rate-
dc.subject.meshOrgan Specificity-
dc.subject.meshOxygen-
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Automated-
dc.subject.meshReference Values-
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Results-
dc.subject.meshSensitivity and Specificity-
dc.subject.meshTissue Distribution-
dc.titleComparison of normal tissue R1 and R*2 modulation by oxygen and carbogen.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentImaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine : official journal of the Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine / Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicineen

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