Can a brief psychological intervention prevent anxiety or depressive disorders in cancer patients? A randomised controlled trial.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/52873
Title:
Can a brief psychological intervention prevent anxiety or depressive disorders in cancer patients? A randomised controlled trial.
Authors:
Pitceathly, Carolyn; Maguire, Peter; Fletcher, I; Parle, Michael; Tomenson, B; Creed, Francis
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: We tested whether a brief psychological intervention could prevent anxiety or depressive disorders among newly diagnosed cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients free of anxiety or depressive disorder were randomised to receive immediate intervention (start of cancer treatment), delayed intervention (8 weeks after starting treatment) or usual care. They were stratified according to risk of developing anxiety or depressive disorders. Primary outcome was measured using a standardised psychiatric interview to detect any anxiety or depressive disorder at 6 and 12 months following the cancer diagnosis. Analyses used conditional odds logistic regression models adjusting for age, gender, concerns and past history to compare outcome of all intervention patients with usual care. RESULTS: A total of 465 patients were recruited. In all, 313 (79%) of the 397 well enough to be interviewed completed the study. At 12 months, there was no difference between the groups receiving the intervention and usual care [odds ratio (OR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-1.17, P = 0.17]. In high-risk patients, those who received the intervention were less likely to develop an anxiety or depressive disorder compared with those who received usual care (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.29-1.00, P = 0.050). In low-risk patients, there was no difference (OR = 1.50, 95% CI 0.51-4.43, P = 0.47). CONCLUSION: A brief intervention, delivered by nonspecialists, promoted adjustment among newly diagnosed cancer patients at high risk of developing anxiety or depressive disorders.
Affiliation:
CRUK Psychological Medicine Group, Stanley House, Christie Hospital, Manchester.
Citation:
Can a brief psychological intervention prevent anxiety or depressive disorders in cancer patients? A randomised controlled trial. 2009: Ann. Oncol.
Journal:
Annals of Oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology / ESMO
Issue Date:
6-Jan-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/52873
DOI:
10.1093/annonc/mdn708
PubMed ID:
19126633
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1569-8041
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPitceathly, Carolyn-
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, I-
dc.contributor.authorParle, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorTomenson, B-
dc.contributor.authorCreed, Francis-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-09T09:10:19Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-09T09:10:19Z-
dc.date.issued2009-01-06-
dc.identifier.citationCan a brief psychological intervention prevent anxiety or depressive disorders in cancer patients? A randomised controlled trial. 2009: Ann. Oncol.en
dc.identifier.issn1569-8041-
dc.identifier.pmid19126633-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/annonc/mdn708-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/52873-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We tested whether a brief psychological intervention could prevent anxiety or depressive disorders among newly diagnosed cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients free of anxiety or depressive disorder were randomised to receive immediate intervention (start of cancer treatment), delayed intervention (8 weeks after starting treatment) or usual care. They were stratified according to risk of developing anxiety or depressive disorders. Primary outcome was measured using a standardised psychiatric interview to detect any anxiety or depressive disorder at 6 and 12 months following the cancer diagnosis. Analyses used conditional odds logistic regression models adjusting for age, gender, concerns and past history to compare outcome of all intervention patients with usual care. RESULTS: A total of 465 patients were recruited. In all, 313 (79%) of the 397 well enough to be interviewed completed the study. At 12 months, there was no difference between the groups receiving the intervention and usual care [odds ratio (OR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-1.17, P = 0.17]. In high-risk patients, those who received the intervention were less likely to develop an anxiety or depressive disorder compared with those who received usual care (OR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.29-1.00, P = 0.050). In low-risk patients, there was no difference (OR = 1.50, 95% CI 0.51-4.43, P = 0.47). CONCLUSION: A brief intervention, delivered by nonspecialists, promoted adjustment among newly diagnosed cancer patients at high risk of developing anxiety or depressive disorders.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Patienten
dc.subjectAnxietyen
dc.subjectDepressive Disorderen
dc.subjectPyschological interventionen
dc.titleCan a brief psychological intervention prevent anxiety or depressive disorders in cancer patients? A randomised controlled trial.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRUK Psychological Medicine Group, Stanley House, Christie Hospital, Manchester.en
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of Oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology / ESMOen
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