Introduction of the activated N-ras oncogene into human fibroblasts by retroviral vector induces morphological transformation and tumorigenicity.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109812
Title:
Introduction of the activated N-ras oncogene into human fibroblasts by retroviral vector induces morphological transformation and tumorigenicity.
Authors:
Kinsella, Anne R; Fiszer-Maliszewska, Lucja; Mitchell, Erika L D; Guo, Ya-Ping; Fox, Margaret; Scott, David
Abstract:
The introduction of activated N-ras cDNA into normal diploid human skin fibroblast cell cultures using the retroviral vector pZIPneo results in a spectrum of morphologies ranging from near normal to, in rare instances, dense piled-up colonies of morphologically transformed cells. However, none of the clones isolated were transformed as assessed by growth on agar or tumorigenicity in nude mice. Introduction of both c-myc and N-ras oncogene cDNAs into normal skin fibroblasts failed to produce transformation as assessed by growth on agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice, although c-myc infection alone conferred immortality and the resultant doubly infected cell line was immortal. Using the same construct, activated N-ras cDNA was shown to transform immortalized human fibroblasts to tumorigenicity. However, immortalization per se was shown not to guarantee 'co-operation' with an activated N-ras gene to give malignant transformation. Although numerical and structural chromosome aberrations (clonal and non-clonal) were observed in some of the cell strains isolated after retroviral infection, these were not directly associated with viral infection, the presence of the oncogenes or with the morphologically transformed phenotype.
Affiliation:
Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Introduction of the activated N-ras oncogene into human fibroblasts by retroviral vector induces morphological transformation and tumorigenicity. 1990, 11 (10):1803-9 Carcinogenesis
Journal:
Carcinogenesis
Issue Date:
Oct-1990
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109812
DOI:
10.1093/carcin/11.10.1803
PubMed ID:
2208593
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0143-3334
Appears in Collections:
All Paterson Institute for Cancer Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Anne Ren
dc.contributor.authorFiszer-Maliszewska, Lucjaen
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Erika L Den
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Ya-Pingen
dc.contributor.authorFox, Margareten
dc.contributor.authorScott, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-18T10:02:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-18T10:02:49Z-
dc.date.issued1990-10-
dc.identifier.citationIntroduction of the activated N-ras oncogene into human fibroblasts by retroviral vector induces morphological transformation and tumorigenicity. 1990, 11 (10):1803-9 Carcinogenesisen
dc.identifier.issn0143-3334-
dc.identifier.pmid2208593-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/carcin/11.10.1803-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109812-
dc.description.abstractThe introduction of activated N-ras cDNA into normal diploid human skin fibroblast cell cultures using the retroviral vector pZIPneo results in a spectrum of morphologies ranging from near normal to, in rare instances, dense piled-up colonies of morphologically transformed cells. However, none of the clones isolated were transformed as assessed by growth on agar or tumorigenicity in nude mice. Introduction of both c-myc and N-ras oncogene cDNAs into normal skin fibroblasts failed to produce transformation as assessed by growth on agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice, although c-myc infection alone conferred immortality and the resultant doubly infected cell line was immortal. Using the same construct, activated N-ras cDNA was shown to transform immortalized human fibroblasts to tumorigenicity. However, immortalization per se was shown not to guarantee 'co-operation' with an activated N-ras gene to give malignant transformation. Although numerical and structural chromosome aberrations (clonal and non-clonal) were observed in some of the cell strains isolated after retroviral infection, these were not directly associated with viral infection, the presence of the oncogenes or with the morphologically transformed phenotype.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancerous Cell Transformationen
dc.subjectCancer DNAen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesion-
dc.subject.meshCell Division-
dc.subject.meshCell Line-
dc.subject.meshCell Transformation, Neoplastic-
dc.subject.meshChromosome Aberrations-
dc.subject.meshChromosome Disorders-
dc.subject.meshClone Cells-
dc.subject.meshDNA-
dc.subject.meshDNA, Neoplasm-
dc.subject.meshFibroblasts-
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulation-
dc.subject.meshGenes, ras-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Vectors-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.subject.meshMice, Nude-
dc.subject.meshRetroviridae-
dc.subject.meshTransfection-
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Heterologous-
dc.titleIntroduction of the activated N-ras oncogene into human fibroblasts by retroviral vector induces morphological transformation and tumorigenicity.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPaterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalCarcinogenesisen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in Christie are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.