2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109487
Title:
The epidemiology of infant cancers.
Authors:
Birch, Jillian M; Blair, Val
Abstract:
Cancers in infants represent less than 0.05% of all malignant neoplasms, but form a particularly interesting group for study. The ratio of solid tumours to leukaemias is 2:1 in children aged 1-14 but 5:1 in infants less than 1 year. The rate for neuroblastoma which is the most common malignancy in infants is four times higher in children aged under 1 year than in 1-14 year olds. Other embryonal tumours, e.g. Wilms', heptablastoma and retinoblastoma also show higher rates in infants. The ratios of incidence in males to females differed in a number of instances in the two age groups, e.g. in leukaemias and liver tumours the male to female ratio is greater than one in 1-14 year old children but less than one in infants. These observations suggest that many infant tumours may be aetiologically distinct. Their early onset and predominantly embryonal nature suggest a pre-natal origin and genetic factors may be important.
Affiliation:
CRC Paediatric Group, Christie Hospital & Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
The epidemiology of infant cancers. 1992, 18:S2-4 Br J Cancer Suppl
Journal:
The British Journal of Cancer Supplement
Issue Date:
Aug-1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109487
PubMed ID:
1503921
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0306-9443
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBirch, Jillian Men
dc.contributor.authorBlair, Valen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-11T15:34:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-11T15:34:25Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-
dc.identifier.citationThe epidemiology of infant cancers. 1992, 18:S2-4 Br J Cancer Supplen
dc.identifier.issn0306-9443-
dc.identifier.pmid1503921-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109487-
dc.description.abstractCancers in infants represent less than 0.05% of all malignant neoplasms, but form a particularly interesting group for study. The ratio of solid tumours to leukaemias is 2:1 in children aged 1-14 but 5:1 in infants less than 1 year. The rate for neuroblastoma which is the most common malignancy in infants is four times higher in children aged under 1 year than in 1-14 year olds. Other embryonal tumours, e.g. Wilms', heptablastoma and retinoblastoma also show higher rates in infants. The ratios of incidence in males to females differed in a number of instances in the two age groups, e.g. in leukaemias and liver tumours the male to female ratio is greater than one in 1-14 year old children but less than one in infants. These observations suggest that many infant tumours may be aetiologically distinct. Their early onset and predominantly embryonal nature suggest a pre-natal origin and genetic factors may be important.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshEngland-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInfant-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshRegistries-
dc.subject.meshSex Ratio-
dc.titleThe epidemiology of infant cancers.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Paediatric Group, Christie Hospital & Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe British Journal of Cancer Supplementen

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