2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109465
Title:
Tumour occurrence and recurrence.
Authors:
Ogilvy-Stuart, Amanda L; Shalet, Stephen M
Abstract:
There is growing concern about the oncogenic potential of growth hormone (GH) used therapeutically. In rat experiments, a variety of malignant tumours have been induced following administration of supraphysiological doses of GH, whilst in other studies in hypophysectomized animals a lower than normal incidence of carcinogen-induced neoplasms was reported. In acromegaly, in which there is a pathologically sustained high GH level, there is a significantly increased incidence of cancer in general and specifically of colonic neoplasia. To determine whether the use of GH in the treatment of radiation-induced GH deficiency causes tumour recurrence, a comparison was made of tumour recurrence rates between 47 children treated with GH for radiation-induced GH deficiency after treatment for a brain tumour and a control population from the North West Children's Cancer Registry who did not receive GH (n = 160). All cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), including those that were (n = 15) and were not (n = 146) treated with GH were reviewed. The computerized tomography (CT) scans in the children with brain tumours were reviewed at the time of GH commencement and subsequently. There were 5 brain tumour recurrences after GH therapy: 1 astrocytoma, 2 ependymomas and 2 medulloblastomas. Adjusting for variables other than GH which might affect tumour recurrence, the estimated relative risk of tumour recurrence was 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.28-2.37). In each tumour category there was no association between the use of GH and subsequent tumour recurrence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Affiliation:
Department of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, UK.
Citation:
Tumour occurrence and recurrence. 1992, 38 Suppl 1:50-5 Horm Res
Journal:
Hormone Research
Issue Date:
1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109465
DOI:
10.1159/000182570
PubMed ID:
1295813
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0301-0163
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOgilvy-Stuart, Amanda Len
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen Men
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-11T14:50:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-11T14:50:15Z-
dc.date.issued1992-
dc.identifier.citationTumour occurrence and recurrence. 1992, 38 Suppl 1:50-5 Horm Resen
dc.identifier.issn0301-0163-
dc.identifier.pmid1295813-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000182570-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109465-
dc.description.abstractThere is growing concern about the oncogenic potential of growth hormone (GH) used therapeutically. In rat experiments, a variety of malignant tumours have been induced following administration of supraphysiological doses of GH, whilst in other studies in hypophysectomized animals a lower than normal incidence of carcinogen-induced neoplasms was reported. In acromegaly, in which there is a pathologically sustained high GH level, there is a significantly increased incidence of cancer in general and specifically of colonic neoplasia. To determine whether the use of GH in the treatment of radiation-induced GH deficiency causes tumour recurrence, a comparison was made of tumour recurrence rates between 47 children treated with GH for radiation-induced GH deficiency after treatment for a brain tumour and a control population from the North West Children's Cancer Registry who did not receive GH (n = 160). All cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), including those that were (n = 15) and were not (n = 146) treated with GH were reviewed. The computerized tomography (CT) scans in the children with brain tumours were reviewed at the time of GH commencement and subsequently. There were 5 brain tumour recurrences after GH therapy: 1 astrocytoma, 2 ependymomas and 2 medulloblastomas. Adjusting for variables other than GH which might affect tumour recurrence, the estimated relative risk of tumour recurrence was 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.28-2.37). In each tumour category there was no association between the use of GH and subsequent tumour recurrence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBrain Canceren
dc.subjectCancer Recurrenceen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukaemia-Lymphomaen
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshBrain Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGrowth Disorders-
dc.subject.meshGrowth Hormone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Recurrence, Local-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPrecursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma-
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries-
dc.titleTumour occurrence and recurrence.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalHormone Researchen

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