Routine follow-up after treatment for ovarian cancer in the United Kingdom (UK): patient and health professional views.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109345
Title:
Routine follow-up after treatment for ovarian cancer in the United Kingdom (UK): patient and health professional views.
Authors:
Lydon, A; Beaver, K; Newbery, Carol; Wray, J
Abstract:
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to explore patients and health professional's perceptions of follow-up service provision following treatment for ovarian cancer. In the United Kingdom, where this study took place, ovarian cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in women. The causes are unknown, symptoms are often vague and most cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage. There is a high likelihood of disease progression and little evidence on the benefits of routine follow-up after treatment for gynaecological cancer. METHOD: Two focus groups were conducted with patients (n=6) and health professionals (n=7) at a hospital in North-West England. RESULTS: From the patient group, three main themes emerged: reassurance, the need for support and information, and alternative approaches to follow-up care. Three main themes emerged from the health professional group: patient attendance at outpatient clinics to monitor for disease progression; the need to modernise the current system; and patients should be encouraged to self-manage their disease. CONCLUSIONS: There were similarities and differences in perceptions of follow-up care procedures between the two focus groups. Patients placed importance on clinical examination in indicating disease recurrence, whereas health professionals viewed this as historical practice with no evidence base. Accurate information on how disease progression is monitored should be communicated to patients. A modified approach to follow-up procedures is suggested as a useful strategy to tailor services to individual needs and preferences, whilst responding to service demands.
Affiliation:
Macmillan Research Unit, School of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Work, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK. Anne.Lydon@manchester.ac.uk
Citation:
Routine follow-up after treatment for ovarian cancer in the United Kingdom (UK): patient and health professional views. 2009, 13 (5):336-43 Eur J Oncol Nurs
Journal:
European Journal of Oncology Nursing
Issue Date:
Dec-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10541/109345
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejon.2009.04.007
PubMed ID:
19535294
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1532-2122
Appears in Collections:
All Christie Publications

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLydon, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBeaver, Ken
dc.contributor.authorNewbery, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorWray, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-09T16:07:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-09T16:07:27Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-
dc.identifier.citationRoutine follow-up after treatment for ovarian cancer in the United Kingdom (UK): patient and health professional views. 2009, 13 (5):336-43 Eur J Oncol Nursen
dc.identifier.issn1532-2122-
dc.identifier.pmid19535294-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejon.2009.04.007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/109345-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The aim of this study was to explore patients and health professional's perceptions of follow-up service provision following treatment for ovarian cancer. In the United Kingdom, where this study took place, ovarian cancer is the most common gynaecological cancer in women. The causes are unknown, symptoms are often vague and most cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage. There is a high likelihood of disease progression and little evidence on the benefits of routine follow-up after treatment for gynaecological cancer. METHOD: Two focus groups were conducted with patients (n=6) and health professionals (n=7) at a hospital in North-West England. RESULTS: From the patient group, three main themes emerged: reassurance, the need for support and information, and alternative approaches to follow-up care. Three main themes emerged from the health professional group: patient attendance at outpatient clinics to monitor for disease progression; the need to modernise the current system; and patients should be encouraged to self-manage their disease. CONCLUSIONS: There were similarities and differences in perceptions of follow-up care procedures between the two focus groups. Patients placed importance on clinical examination in indicating disease recurrence, whereas health professionals viewed this as historical practice with no evidence base. Accurate information on how disease progression is monitored should be communicated to patients. A modified approach to follow-up procedures is suggested as a useful strategy to tailor services to individual needs and preferences, whilst responding to service demands.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectOvarian Canceren
dc.subject.meshAftercare-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshAttitude of Health Personnel-
dc.subject.meshContinuity of Patient Care-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFocus Groups-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Accessibility-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOvarian Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPatient Satisfaction-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Health Care-
dc.subject.meshRecurrence-
dc.subject.meshSocial Support-
dc.titleRoutine follow-up after treatment for ovarian cancer in the United Kingdom (UK): patient and health professional views.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMacmillan Research Unit, School of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Work, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, UK. Anne.Lydon@manchester.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Oncology Nursingen

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